Facebook to restrict access to Russian state media outlets in EU | Russia-Ukraine crisis News


Meta’s head of worldwide affairs says firm will restrict entry to RT and Sputnik in EU amid Russian assault on Ukraine.

Fb’s mum or dad firm Meta has introduced plans to limit entry to Russian state media retailers RT and Sputnik throughout the European Union, as Russia pressed on with its invasion of Ukraine.

Meta’s head of worldwide affairs, Nick Clegg, tweeted on Monday afternoon that the social media firm had obtained requests “from a variety of Governments and the EU to take additional steps in relation to Russian state-controlled media”.

Clegg mentioned Meta would proceed to work intently with governments on the problem.

“Given the distinctive nature of the present scenario, we will likely be limiting entry to RT and Sputnik throughout the EU right now,” Clegg mentioned on Twitter, with out going into additional element about what the restrictions would entail.

The announcement comes on the fifth day of Russia’s army assault on Ukraine, which has killed no less than 352 folks to this point, in line with the Ukrainian well being ministry, and garnered widespread condemnation.

Russian state-run media exercise on social media platforms has emerged as a contentious situation for large tech corporations in the course of the invasion of Ukraine.

Meta, Google and YouTube have taken measures in latest days to limit Russian state media retailers from creating wealth from advertisements on their websites. Twitter banned RT and Sputnik from promoting on its web site in 2017.

On Friday, Fb mentioned it had restricted Russian state media’s capability to earn cash on the social media platform. The transfer got here after Russia had introduced it was partially limiting entry to Fb as the corporate mentioned it refused to adjust to an order from the Russian authorities to cease fact-checkers and content material warning labels on its platforms.

The EU mentioned on Sunday it could ban RT and Sputnik, whereas Canadian telecoms operators have additionally stopped providing the RT channel.

Police detaining protestersProtests towards the Russian invasion of Ukraine resumed on Monday, with folks taking to the streets of Moscow, St Petersburg, and different cities [Dmitri Lovetsky/AP Photo]

On Monday, the web sites of a number of Russian media retailers had been hacked, with a message condemning Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine showing on their important pages.

Whereas it’s unclear who was chargeable for the hack, the interference hints at a rising anti-war sentiment amongst Russians and others world wide. Russian President Vladimir Putin’s authorities additionally has been accused of searching for to suppress dissent.

Russia’s state communications and media watchdog Roskomnadzor blocked a number of Russian and Ukrainian media retailers over their protection of the invasion of Ukraine.

The Russian journal The New Instances, which has been brazenly important of the Kremlin, was blocked for reporting particulars about Russian army casualties in Ukraine, which the Russian defence ministry has not disclosed.

Protests towards the invasion have been held throughout Russia for a number of days, regardless of authorities launching a mass arrest marketing campaign towards the demonstrators, whereas almost a million folks signed a web-based petition demanding an finish to the warfare.



Legislators have offered no reason why they are out to limit access to the legislative process.


Each homes may as an alternative work to type press corps that facilitate two-way conversations.

(Rachel Rydalch | The Salt Lake Tribune) Home speaker Brad Wilson R-Kaysville, addressing the Home of Representatives as the beginning of the 2022 legislative session begins on the Utah Capitol in Salt Lake Metropolis on Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022.

Members of the Utah Home of Representatives are poised to move a brand new algorithm that appear to have no goal apart from to make it tougher for the press — and, by means of the press, the general public — to know simply what’s going on within the halls of energy.

Utahns – and voters – ought to perceive that the press will not be looking for particular entry or favors for personal, private profit. Journalists are looking for the power to do their job, sharing info with individuals who don’t have the time or assets to comply with payments as they make their manner by means of the system. And the folks ought to let their lawmakers know that they anticipate the press to have the ability to do this job with out undue interference.

The proposed new guidelines — contained in HR2 — comply with the same transfer not too long ago by the Utah Senate, additionally designed to discourage journalists’ entry to members of the Legislature and permit them to dodge questions on pending laws.

However the Home model, in its preliminary draft, seems to go even additional within the try to fence off the press, banning reporters from getting into, with out particular permission, the identical committee hearings which might be presently open to the general public. A spokesperson for the Utah Home on Friday mentioned media entry to Home committee rooms wouldn’t change as “committee rooms are public areas,” even because the textual content of the invoice signifies as a lot.

It’s clear that members of each legislative our bodies are involved that the press is simply too ahead in its makes an attempt to maintain a watch on how our legal guidelines are made.

Neither HR2 sponsor Rep. James Dunnigan nor another lawmaker has justified the tightening of the foundations (throughout a senate listening to, lawmakers mentioned there have been 2 issues of safety in 22 years). They’ve made no declare that any member of the Fourth Property has harassed any member of the Legislature, disrupted the folks’s enterprise, blocked a fireplace exit, spilled their espresso, unfold a virus, or carried out anything that has sparked this yr’s drive to make the eyes and ears of the folks persona non grata on the Home and Senate flooring.

The observe within the Capitol has been unchanged for a few years. Whereas members are debating and voting throughout the once- or twice-daily interval generally known as “flooring time,” the press, like nearly everybody else, is anticipated to maintain its distance. As soon as the gavel goes down, nonetheless, the truth that most members of the Home and Senate are gathered in a single place, if just for a couple of minutes, makes it the perfect time to method lawmakers for a couple of questions on how their legislative proposals got here to be, who advantages, who pays, or why they could have voted a selected invoice or modification up or down.

Apparently, that’s now slightly extra accessible than legislative leaders wish to be. The accepted Senate guidelines and proposed Home modifications require reporters to first acquire the approval of the Home speaker, Senate president or their designee to get onto the Home or Senate flooring to get their questions answered. Or, no less than, requested.

The Senate rule was sponsored by Sen. Mike McKell, R-Spanish Fork, and flew by means of that physique’s Enterprise and Labor Committee with the votes of Sens. Curtis Bramble, Kirk Cullimore, Don Ipson, Dan McCay, Scott Sandall, Todd Weiler and the one Democrat to help it, Karen Mayne. Sen. Gene Davis, a Democrat, was the one committee member to vote in opposition to it.

The rule later handed the entire Senate by a vote of 17-5. Sen. John Johnson was the one Republican to vote in opposition to the rule. As a result of the measure is a rule affecting solely the Senate, it didn’t have to go to the Home and won’t be introduced to Gov. Spencer Cox for signature or veto.

The extra restrict included within the Home model, requiring particular permission for journalists to even enter the identical committee rooms which might be at all times open to the general public, seems to both be a further unwarranted assault on the press or a fairly critical drafting error.

Some legislative leaders have mentioned that the press can get the entry it wants on the common, if typically temporary, occasions when leaders and a handful of different members make themselves accessible for questions. However these briefings are much less an opportunity for the press and lawmakers to work together than they’re a way for a couple of highly effective legislators to regulate the circulation of data.

As has been proposed on this house earlier than, it’s time for the press and the Legislature to work out a extra formal association by which an affiliation of journalists will deal with the accreditation of reporters and photographers who search to cowl the legislative session, negotiate the foundations of conduct and phrases of entry and, if ever crucial, droop or expel a member for disruptive or different unhealthy conduct. A press corps, if you’ll.

Because it stands, every home now has the ability to droop or cancel the press credentials of any particular person with no normal of conduct or technique of enchantment. That’s not the way in which to do the folks’s enterprise.

It is smart to have a transparent algorithm for everybody’s conduct within the chambers of the Utah Legislature. However these guidelines ought to be drawn by all stakeholders and in a manner that makes the circulation of data from the Capitol to the folks simpler, no more tough.

Russia limiting access to Facebook over fact-checking row | Russia-Ukraine crisis News


Russia has introduced it’s partially limiting entry to Fb, after the US social media large stated it refused to adjust to an order from the Russian authorities to cease fact-checkers and content material warning labels on its platforms amid the nation’s assault on Ukraine.

The Russian communications regulator, Roskomnadzor, stated on Friday that Fb had ignored its calls for to raise restrictions on 4 Russian media shops on its platform – RIA information company, the Defence Ministry’s Zvezda TV, and web sites gazeta.ru and lenta.ru.

It was not instantly clear what Russia’s restrictions on Fb would contain.

“In accordance with the choice of the Common Prosecutor’s Workplace, ranging from Feb. 25, partial entry restrictions are being imposed by Roskomnadzor on the Fb social community,” the regulator stated in a press release.

Social media networks have develop into one of many fronts in Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, with deceptive info but additionally real-time monitoring relating to a shortly creating battle.

Russian forces have been shifting nearer to the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, as bloody battles befell nationwide on the second day of the Russian assault on its neighbour.

The United Nations has stated greater than 50,000 Ukrainians have fled to different nations because the invasion started, whereas tens of hundreds extra have additionally been internally displaced, in search of shelter in church buildings, basements and underground metro stations.

On Friday, the vp of world affairs at Fb’s guardian firm, Meta, stated that “the Russian authorities ordered us to cease the unbiased fact-checking and labelling of content material posted on Fb by 4 Russian state-owned media organizations”.

“We refused. In consequence, they’ve introduced they are going to be limiting using our providers,” Nick Clegg wrote in a press release shared on Twitter.

“Abnormal Russians are utilizing our apps to precise themselves and arrange for motion. We would like them to proceed to make their voices heard, share what’s occurring, and arrange via Fb, Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger.”

Moscow has been attempting to exert tighter management over the web and large tech for years, one thing critics say threatens particular person and company freedom, and is a part of a wider crackdown in opposition to outspoken opponents of the Kremlin.

Al Jazeera’s Bernard Smith, reporting from Moscow, defined that because the Russian invasion of Ukraine started, Russian personalities and celebrities have shared anti-war messages on social media, together with on Fb and Instagram.

“There could also be one thing within the Russian authorities wanting to scale back the flexibility of individuals to put up these anti-war messages,” Smith stated.

1000’s have joined anti-war protests throughout Russia, together with in Moscow and St Petersburg, because the invasion was launched. Greater than 1,700 folks in 54 Russian cities had been arrested on Thursday, at the very least 957 of them within the capital.

Meta, which has lengthy been below stress to fight misinformation on its platforms, companions with third-party fact-checkers, together with the Reuters and AFP information companies, which charge and label content material for veracity. Meta says that content material rated false, altered or partly false is proven to fewer customers.



White House Prepares Curbs on Russia’s Access to U.S. Technology


Kevin Wolf, a accomplice in worldwide commerce at Akin Gump who labored in export controls below the Obama administration, mentioned the White Home may tailor its use of export controls to focus on sure strategic sectors, for instance firms within the aerospace or maritime business, whereas bypassing merchandise utilized by the Russian populace, like washing machines.

“They’re making it clear they’re not attempting to take motion that harms odd Russians,” Mr. Wolf mentioned.

Andy Shoyer, co-lead of worldwide arbitration, commerce and advocacy for Sidley Austin, mentioned the restrictions appeared more likely to give attention to semiconductors and semiconductor tools. The novel export controls that the US wielded towards Huawei have a robust attain with regards to semiconductors, since even chips made overseas are principally manufactured and examined utilizing equipment primarily based on American designs, he mentioned.

“It’s not simply what’s bodily exported from the U.S.,” Mr. Shoyer mentioned. “It may embody a considerable quantity of manufacturing, as a result of a lot of the semiconductor business depends on U.S. expertise.”

The worldwide semiconductor business, which has been roiled by shortages and provide chain disruptions all through the pandemic, may face extra disruptions given Ukraine’s function within the semiconductor provide chain.

Stacy Rasgon, a senior analyst at Bernstein Analysis, mentioned Ukraine was an necessary location for the purification of neon, a fuel used within the manufacturing of semiconductors. Whereas neon prices have been only a tiny fraction of what semiconductor firms pay, “probably placing a big fraction of purification capability in danger sounds considerably ominous for an business already scuffling with shortages,” he mentioned.

A spokesman for the Semiconductor Trade Affiliation mentioned the group was nonetheless evaluating potential impacts associated to Russia’s and Ukraine’s roles as supplies suppliers. However he mentioned Russia was not a big direct shopper of semiconductors, accounting for lower than 0.1 p.c of worldwide chip purchases, in line with the World Semiconductor Commerce Statistics group.

Utah lawmaker moves to further limit media access to lawmakers at Capitol


The measure is sort of similar to a guidelines decision authorized by Utah Senate Republicans final week.

Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune Stephanie Burdick of Salt Lake Metropolis units up a gathering for Thursday with Rep. Jim Dunnigan, R-Taylorsville, who voted in opposition to SB96 in the course of the Home Enterprise and Labor Committee vote, Feb. 6, 2019.

A Taylorsville Republican filed a guidelines decision on Thursday to restrict media entry to lawmakers on the Home ground — an identical measure authorized by Utah Senate Republicans final week.

The measure, HR2, sponsored by state Rep. James Dunnigan, would require credentialed reporters to get the permission of the Home of Representatives speaker or the speaker’s “designee” to “conduct and file” interviews with lawmakers within the Home chamber, gallery, lounge, halls and committee rooms.

HR2 would additionally forestall journalists from standing behind a committee room dais with out the approval of a committee chair. Photographers and videographers have usually stood behind the dais throughout committee hearings to seize the face of a person who’s testifying for or in opposition to a invoice.

Moreover, the proposed guidelines decision would require journalists to get approval from Home speaker permission to enter Home committee rooms, in line with the measure’s textual content. It’s unclear how that will probably be enforced as legislative committee rooms are open to the general public.

“After all committee hearings are open to the general public, we stream them for the general public to take part in,” Home Speaker Brad Wilson advised reporters on Friday. “There was some query round the place we’re placing cameras and the disruption that happens typically in committee hearings. In order that’s one of many issues we’ve been attempting to work via.”

If handed, the hassle would change the best way reporters have communicated with lawmakers at Utah’s Capitol.

Dunnigan didn’t instantly reply to a request for touch upon Thursday night.

“When conducting an interview within the Home chamber, the information media might enter the chamber for the aim of conducting a selected interview and shall exit the chamber promptly after finishing the interview,” in line with the proposed rule change.

The measure is sort of similar to a guidelines decision authorized by Utah Senate Republicans final week. State Sen. Mike McKell, R-Spanish Fork, who sponsored that laws beforehand stated the measure would set up clear guidelines over media entry and deal with safety considerations within the Senate.

As a result of it’s a guidelines decision, the measure would solely require a two-thirds vote from the Home of Representatives to cross.

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