Medicaid funds mired in red tape for people with disabilities : Shots


The American Rescue Plan Act that President Biden signed into legislation elevated funding to Medicaid, however delays and pink tape have saved a number of states from claiming a lot of the money nearly a yr later.

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The American Rescue Plan Act that President Biden signed into legislation elevated funding to Medicaid, however delays and pink tape have saved a number of states from claiming a lot of the money nearly a yr later.

Doug Mills/Getty Photographs

Matthew Southern, 35, who has mental and developmental disabilities, is ready to keep out of an establishment as a result of well being aides paid via a Medicaid program help him and his roommate with extraordinary duties.

However amid a employee scarcity worsened by the pandemic, Southern’s father, Dan, has needed to step in to fill in gaps in his son’s care by volunteering at their residence 45 minutes away from his northwestern Atlanta suburb. He blames the low pay throughout the trade.

“Nobody desires to work for $12 an hour,” Dan Southern mentioned. “Individuals can work at Burger King and earn more money.”

Final yr introduced an injection of hope: The federal authorities, via the American Rescue Plan Act that President Joe Biden signed into legislation in March 2021, elevated funding with a 10-percentage level match that might quantity to some $25 billion in federal cash for Medicaid residence and community-based providers, which have lengthy confronted staffing crunches. That huge infusion of money may very well be utilized by states to buttress wages, transfer folks off ready lists for incapacity providers, practice extra employees, or increase lined providers for weak aged and disabled folks, serving to to maintain them out of nursing properties.

However nearly a yr later, Indiana, Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, Ohio and Washington have been amongst 19 states as of Feb. 17 but to obtain the “conditional approval” wanted from the Facilities for Medicare & Medicaid Providers to totally entry the cash.

Over half of states — 28 of them — obtained such approval in 2022, based on CMS. That is greater than 9 months after the reduction bundle was signed into legislation. California, for instance, obtained its conditional approval Jan. 4. Different states have their very own pink tape and are ready for legislative or different approvals, Kaiser Well being Information discovered by querying all state Medicaid workplaces.

“All of us would have preferred to see the cash out sooner,” mentioned Damon Terzaghi, a senior director at ADvancing States, a nationwide membership affiliation for state ageing and disabilities businesses. “Forms is what it’s.”

Daniel Tsai, director of the CMS Heart for Medicaid and CHIP Providers, mentioned that this infusion of federal assist was a “life-changing quantity of funding,” and that CMS staffers have been doing all the things they may alongside states to “transfer ahead as shortly as doable.”

Tsai additionally identified that the states’ partial approval from CMS, which they’ve all obtained, permits them to entry a few of the cash. However some states — reminiscent of Kansas and Wyoming — have been reluctant to take action with out full approval. Others bemoaned the gradual federal course of.

The Medicaid disbursement course of contrasts sharply with the distribution of reduction {dollars} via Medicare channels to hospitals, mentioned Connie Garner, nationwide public coverage adviser for Easterseals, a well being care supplier for folks with disabilities. Garner mentioned the everyday back-and-forth within the federal-state Medicaid partnership is a part of the rationale for the delay, in addition to states’ need to spend the huge amount of money properly. However funding is required now, she mentioned.

“Wanted care cannot wait,” she mentioned.

A 2021 survey by the American Community of Group Choices and Assets, an advocacy group for suppliers that assist these with mental and developmental disabilities, discovered that due to staffing shortages, greater than three-quarters of service suppliers have been turning away new referrals, greater than half have been discontinuing packages and providers, and the overwhelming majority have been fighting recruitment and retention of workers.

Seema Verma, CMS administrator through the Trump administration, mentioned that such funding was essential contemplating the staffing crunches, however that states’ Medicaid packages most likely have been challenged to effectively transfer that huge sum of money.

“The truth is completely different states might have completely different procurement processes that may take a very long time,” she mentioned.

Colorado was the primary state to realize full entry to the cash — almost $530 million — again in September, based on Bonnie Silva, director for the Workplace of Group Dwelling on the Colorado Division of Well being Care Coverage & Financing.

The cash has already gone towards elevating the bottom wage for direct care employees, Silva mentioned, from $12.47 to $15 an hour — which Democratic Gov. Jared Polis has proposed in his price range to make everlasting, as a result of the federal funds cease in 2024. The state can be hiring dozens of short-term workers.

That was all doable, Silva mentioned, as a result of her staff leveraged relationships with their governor and legislators, in addition to moved shortly on federal deadlines. As for states that also have not obtained funds, “I do not know what they’re doing,” she mentioned. “It’s plenty of gymnastics, however they need to be transferring.”

In equity, she mentioned, some states might not have legislators or governors as keen to be as versatile with Medicaid, whereas others might have been slowed by their legislative calendars.

CMS’ Tsai mentioned the company’s workers has dealt with greater than twice as many proposals and amendments for residence and neighborhood providers over the previous yr, on prime of coping with such funding approvals. “We’re doing our greatest to have the ability to triage and prioritize,” he mentioned.

Cautious planning and coordination on all sides is critical, mentioned Matt Salo, government director of the Nationwide Affiliation of Medicaid Administrators, as a result of the tranche of money is a one-time infusion. That makes some states hesitant to extend home-care employee salaries they might not be capable of preserve.

Spending till 2024 in authorities time is sort of a “nanosecond,” Silva mentioned. She’s hopeful that extra money is coming via Biden’s Construct Again Higher plan, though the destiny of that laws stays unclear.

“If we actually wish to remodel how care is offered, we should — not ought to, might — have ongoing federal investments to assist that change,” Silva mentioned.

In the meantime, the Consortium for Residents with Disabilities, which represents a number of nationwide incapacity teams, has requested the federal authorities to think about extending the spending deadline previous 2024, citing the compressed timeline CMS and states face.

New Mexico has but to obtain the total inexperienced mild from CMS, mentioned its Medicaid director, Nicole Comeaux. Nothing is straightforward about this course of, she mentioned, as a result of it could require waivers, public remark or legislative signoffs. Her company has additionally misplaced workers.

“We’ve the identical people doing this work on prime of their regular work, in order that’s additionally made it slower than we’d have preferred it to be,” Comeaux added.

Jackie Farwell, spokesperson for the Maine Division of Well being and Human Providers, mentioned her company needed to make “vital adjustments” to its claims and accounting programs to fulfill federal necessities.

Others have been extra direct about federal holdups: “The delay was attributable to federal approval timelines taking longer than anticipated,” mentioned Sarah Berg, spokesperson for the Minnesota Division of Human Providers.

Dan Berland, director of federal coverage for the Nationwide Affiliation of State Administrators of Developmental Disabilities Providers, pressured the cash will get there, as federal cash not accessed within the match from this previous yr may be claimed retroactively.

For these coping with employee shortages, although, the delay has actual penalties. In Georgia, which bought its full OK the week of Feb. 14, it is unclear how briskly the cash can be despatched to many supplier organizations.

Bob Rice’s stepdaughter, Jennifer Randolph, a nonverbal 50-year-old with cerebral palsy who makes use of a wheelchair, lived at a bunch residence in Athens, Ga., run by Hope Haven of Northeast Georgia for a number of years.

However amid staffing shortages through the pandemic, Hope Haven closed the power down.

Since then, Randolph has cycled into her third group residence — one which’s an hour away from her stepfather’s home. And he fears that the staffing downside will disrupt their lives once more.

KHN (Kaiser Well being Information) is a nationwide newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about well being points. It’s an editorially impartial working program of KFF (Kaiser Household Basis).

Engineer develops imitation red blood cells to deliver lifesaving drugs — ScienceDaily


From the liver to the kidneys to the lungs, the human physique is supplied with many ranges of filters, which shield the physique from dangerous outdoors supplies. However this method additionally has its downsides. Critically vital medicine similar to chemotherapy or a number of sclerosis remedies are additionally international supplies, so the physique filters out a big portion of those medicine — as much as 90%, in some instances.

A technique scientists and physicians compensate for that is by giving sufferers substantial portions of a drug. This fashion, despite the fact that a lot of the drug will get filtered out, sufficient of it will get by means of to get the job carried out. However larger dosage ranges additionally imply extra antagonistic unintended effects. To keep away from such excessive dosages, one other technique is to design the automobile carrying the drug to focus on a selected vacation spot.

“Many drug supply autos fail to succeed in the proper location within the physique, and the principle cause is as a result of our our bodies have this very nice filtering system. So a lot of them find yourself within the liver, the kidney or the spleen,” mentioned Minkyu Kim, assistant professor of supplies science and engineering and biomedical engineering. “If we are able to overcome this by creating new drug supply autos, it is going to be a major advance.”

Kim is getting down to just do that with a $600,000 CAREER Award, a Nationwide Science Basis award in help of early-career college who’ve the potential to function educational function fashions in analysis and training. His plan is to mix supplies science, artificial biology and multiscale mechanics to develop a brand new type of drug supply microparticle designed to bypass the physique’s filtration techniques.

Identical Medication, New Car

How do you get previous a system designed to disclaim entry to outsiders? You masquerade as an insider. Kim is making a microparticle automobile that mimics the properties of a crimson blood cell. These cells encompass a protein- and lipid-based casing carrying hemoglobin, the protein which transports oxygen all through the physique. As a substitute of being a automobile for hemoglobin, the microparticle Kim designs can be a automobile for drug particles. He’ll first use a well-established course of to comprise a drug in a microsphere core. Then, he’ll add a layer of synthetic proteins he develops, adopted by a lipid bilayer. Taken collectively, these parts imitate a crimson blood cell, and even allow a managed launch of the drug. It could possibly carry these medicine previous a collection of organic filters to the a part of the physique the place the medicine are wanted.

It is as in case you wanted to attend an occasion that solely admitted folks driving crimson vehicles, so that you borrowed a crimson automobile from a good friend. You’d get to the place you needed to go, since you used a automobile that was allowed in. After all, constructing a protein construction that imitates the qualities of a crimson blood cell is way more sophisticated than borrowing a automobile. Purple blood cells have just a few key properties that are most vital to mimic. For one, they’ll squeeze by means of very small areas and return to their authentic form, time and again.

“A crimson blood cell is about 7 micrometers in diameter, and so they undergo microcapillaries, that are quite a bit smaller than that,” mentioned Kim, who can also be a member of the BIO5 Institute. “The cytoskeleton of a crimson blood cell is made up of a well-ordered construction of proteins. When it wants to maneuver by means of a small area, that construction may be prolonged by protein unfolding, however as soon as the stresses are eliminated, the unique construction returns. A crimson blood cell can do that a thousand occasions and proceed to point out the identical mechanical habits.”

Purple blood cells may keep within the physique for much longer than typical drug supply autos.

“Proper now, the destiny of drug supply autos is as much as 4 weeks, most,” Kim mentioned. “My aim is for these microparticles to succeed in the lifespan of a crimson blood cell, which is about 4 months. And ultimately, I hope, even longer.”

As a result of crimson blood cells are so efficient at transferring by means of the physique, some researchers have investigated the potential of utilizing precise crimson blood cells as drug autos. However this requires human blood donations, specific storage strategies, and cautious accounting of blood kind. This automobile Kim plans to create may very well be tailored to hold all kinds of medicine and utilized in sufferers with any blood kind.

“The aim is to develop a common platform anybody can begin with, to engineer no matter they need,” Kim mentioned. “You’ll be able to engineer the surface. You’ll be able to engineer the within.”

Drilling Holes on the Red Planet




This picture reveals the Highfield drill gap, on Vera Rubin Ridge in Gale crater on Mars, made by NASA’s Curiosity rover in its seek for rock samples. Only in the near past, scientists introduced that an evaluation of rock samples collected by the rover have been enriched in carbon 12, a kind of carbon that on Earth is related to organic processes.

Two Utah food pantries are closing. Blame red tape.


West Valley Metropolis • Brenda and Kelly made it a routine to go to a West Valley Metropolis meals pantry run by Utah Neighborhood Motion. Each month they might keep in line of their automobile to get objects to enhance what that they had of their fridge.

“We used to obtain [federal food assistance],” mentioned Kelly, who requested to be recognized solely by his first identify whereas discussing their want for assist. “Then they decided that we earned an excessive amount of. However, actually, incomes an excessive amount of is simply paying all of your payments and never having sufficient for meals. It’s form of arduous.”

Utah Neighborhood Motion’s vitamin and emergency meals division operates pantries in West Valley Metropolis and Midvale. They’ve been dependable sources for people and households struggling to make ends meet.

However, on the finish of this month, the pantries received’t be working as standard.

The reason being a battle between Utah Neighborhood Motion and Utah Meals Financial institution insurance policies. The meals financial institution, which supplies many of the items for the pantries, requires its shoppers solely to state their names, how many individuals are of their family and what number of kids they feed to gather groceries.

Ginette Bott, president and CEO of the Utah Meals Financial institution, highlighted that that is the way in which her group expects the 227 pantries it provides all through the state to function.

“To ensure that us, being Utah Meals Financial institution, to be in compliance with the product that we’re giving them without cost, they should observe our pointers,” Bott mentioned. “They will’t ask for Social Safety [numbers]. They will’t ask for wage verification.”

[Read more: There are 410,000 Utahns who are hungry. Here’s how you can help.]

However the nonprofit Utah Neighborhood Motion has to adjust to federal grants it has obtained to run its applications, requiring its pantries to ask for extra info from those that use the service.

“The funding they’ve,” mentioned Jennifer Godfrey, CEO of Utah Neighborhood Motion, “isn’t almost as restrictive because the funding I’ve.”

For its half, the Utah Meals Financial institution has its personal guidelines to observe.

“If we permit them to go on and ask for all that stuff … we’re out of compliance with the teams that we get meals from,” Bott mentioned. “Then which means we’d be in jeopardy of being an entity that would assist.

“It truly is a disgrace,” she added, “that one thing so simple as a easy clerical process can’t be tailored or adjusted to make certain all these people are receiving meals.”

Both manner, plans are within the works to proceed feeding these in want — even after the pantries in West Valley Metropolis and Midvale stop operations come March.

Round 2020, Godfrey mentioned, the Utah Meals Financial institution started sending out cellular meals pantries. It manages 13 cellular pantries throughout Salt Lake County.

“We began to have conversations with them with reference to transitioning our operations to their cellular pantries as a result of they’ll attain extra those who manner,” Godfrey mentioned. “It’s quicker, when it comes to service, and they’re prepared to serve the communities during which we’re at the moment in.

“As companions,” she mentioned, “each of us intend to ensure the group stays served.”

Utah Neighborhood Motion is collaborating with the Utah Meals Financial institution by supplying details about which areas want probably the most meals help. It’s assessing the place individuals who go to the pantries are from and whether or not there’s a necessity for added drops to serve them.

The teams additionally hope to have the cellular pantries go to 8446 S. Harrison St., Midvale, and 3060 s. Lester St., West Valley Metropolis, the place the Utah Neighborhood Motion pantries now function, mentioned Godfrey. “We’re being very cognizant that there’s not a spot of companies inside the group. And, really, the shoppers on the opposite finish shouldn’t really feel the transition in any respect.”

Bott says this shift won’t be simple, nonetheless.

“When a pantry like this closes, it takes time earlier than folks acknowledge that service isn’t there they usually begin to attain out for assist,” she mentioned. “It wouldn’t be like I might exit in a day or two with a cellular pantry and say, ‘We’re right here.’ It doesn’t work that manner.”

Moreover, the present Utah Neighborhood Motion pantries have the capability to function at greater volumes than a cellular operation.

Within the meantime, Brenda and Kelly, who simply heard concerning the adjustments, are considering the place to go for meals help. They’ve visited another pantries in church buildings in Murray and downtown Salt Lake Metropolis, however none affords as a lot as this program.

“This sort of sucks. They’re one of many massive ones,” Kelly mentioned. “They offer good meals. It’s not all the time expired and the stuff doesn’t all the time go unhealthy.”

Alixel Cabrera is a Report for America corps member and writes concerning the standing of communities on the west facet of the Salt Lake Valley for The Salt Lake Tribune. Your donation to match our RFA grant helps maintain her writing tales like this one; please take into account making a tax-deductible reward of any quantity as we speak by clicking right here.

Correction • Feb. 21, 1:15 p.m.: This story has been up to date to appropriate the spelling of Brenda’s identify and attributions to Kelly’s quotes.

No. 4 Red Rocks score season low in first-ever loss to Arizona after shaky beam


Estimated learn time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — The No. 4 Purple Rocks discovered themselves ready they’ve by no means been in earlier than within the storied historical past of this system Friday night time.

On the McKale Heart in Tucson, Arizona, the Purple Rocks have been on the dropping finish of a convention meet in opposition to a winless Arizona workforce. It is the primary time in 68 tries that Arizona has come away with a win in opposition to Utah.

The Purple Rocks entered the ultimate rotation of the night time on beam with a .500 lead over the GymCats and seemed to make it 68-straight wins in this system’s closing convention meet of the season. However after two falls on beam by Adrienne Randall and Cristal Isa, Utah didn’t cross the 197 mark for the primary time this season, falling to Arizona 196.850-196.775.

It was the third meet in per week’s time for Utah and an uncharacteristic night time after two meets with the best scores of the season.

Utah head coach Tom Farden mentioned he was “clearly dissatisfied” by the consequence, however felt his workforce had a ok night time on the primary three rotations earlier than the night time fell aside on beam with the 2 falls.

And although a loss to Arizona stings within the second, Utah has executed sufficient within the final two meets — a 198.000 in opposition to Oregon State and a 197.950 in opposition to Washington — to enhance their nationwide qualifying rating to maneuver as much as No. 2 within the nation when the rankings are up to date Monday (barring enhancements from different groups within the nation).

Friday night time’s meet was about enhancing upon a earlier low highway rating in opposition to California (197.275), however the Purple Rocks should wait till the ultimate highway meet of the season in opposition to LSU to make up floor in NQS.

And to Arizona’s credit score, they introduced their finest efficiency of the season Friday night time and recorded a season-high rating in opposition to the league’s preseason favourite, beating a earlier season excessive of 196.400 in opposition to in-state rival Arizona State on Feb. 12.

The Purple Rocks managed favorable scores within the first three rotations — a 49.350 on bars, a 49.300 on vault and a 49.400 on ground — however could not preserve the lead on an occasion that has been hit and miss for the workforce this season.

Utah has recorded the best workforce rating on beam this season twice however has had three meets with low scores hovering round 49. However a season low of 48.725 on Friday was the underside of the competitors.

Freshman Amelie Morgan led off on beam with a 9.875 rating, adopted up by fellow Olympian Grace McCallum’s 9.90 to present the beam workforce a powerful begin. However Adrianne Randall fell off the beam on her first trick after which struggled to complete out the routine with out some stumbles.

Abby Paulson received the workforce again on observe with a 9.90 rating within the fourth spot, however Cristal Isa could not save herself from a fall within the fifth spot. Isa completed her routine with none errors and caught the touchdown to attain a 9.075, however the injury was already executed. Even Maile O’Keefe’s 9.975 within the anchor place wasn’t sufficient will Utah again for a win.

One constructive for the Purple Rocks is freshman Kara Eaker, who sprained her ankle within the first week of the season, exhibitioned on beam Friday night time; nonetheless, she didn’t dismount from the beam in her gradual return to exercise.

McCallum, who was the one member of the Purple Rocks to take part in all occasions, gained the all-around competitors with a 39.500 rating. She beat out Arizona’s Malia Hargrove (39.450) and Emily Mueller (39.350).

The Purple Rocks have per week off earlier than returning to motion in opposition to Minnesota on the Huntsman Heart on March 4 (7 p.m. MST, Pac-12) within the workforce’s closing residence sport of the season.

Staff scores

No. 4 Utah

  • Bars (49.350)
  • Vault (98.650, 49.300)
  • Flooring (148.050, 49.400)
  • Beam (196.775, 48.725)

Arizona

  • Vault (49.075)
  • Bars (98.275, 49.200)
  • Beam (147.550, 49.275)
  • Flooring (196.850, 49.300)

Particular person Purple Rock scores

1st Rotation: Bars (49.350)

  • Amelie Morgan: 9.825
  • Grace McCallum: 9.850
  • Abby Paulson: 9.875
  • Sage Thompson: 9.925
  • Maile O’Keefe: 9.775
  • Cristal Isa: 9.875

2nd Rotation: Vault (49.300)

  • Sage Thompson: 9.800
  • Cammy Corridor: 9.250
  • Lucy Stanhope: 9.875
  • Jaedyn Rucker: 9.950
  • Alexia Burch: 9.850
  • Grace McCallum: 9.825

third Rotation: Flooring (49.400)

  • Abby Paulson: 9.850
  • Jaylene Gilstrap: 9.825
  • Jaedyn Rucker: 9.875
  • Grace McCallum: 9.925
  • Maile O’Keefe: 9.925
  • Sydney Soloski: 9.825

4th Rotation: Beam (48.725)

  • Amelie Morgan: 9.875
  • Grace McCallum: 9.900
  • Adrienne Randall: 8.925
  • Abby Paulson: 9.900
  • Cristal Isa: 9.075
  • Maile O’Keefe: 9.975

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As No. 4 Utah prepares for Arizona, where do the Red Rocks stand?


Utah gymnasts have endured some early adversity

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Utah’s Abby Paulson competes on the beam throughout their gymnastics meet with Stanford on the Huntsman Heart in Salt Lake Metropolis, Saturday, Jan. 29, 2022.

At a look, Utah’s gymnastics meet at Arizona on Friday ought to be a runaway win for the Utes. The Utes have scored 197 or larger in each meet this season and are coming off their two greatest meets of the season whereas Arizona has but to interrupt the 197 mark and hasn’t received a meet. It’s logical to assume the Utes can have a simple night time.

That is the purpose when gymnastics followers will begin guffawing, due to course, nothing appears to be logical about this season and all the things appears to be onerous.

Simply take a look at how Washington pushed the Utes earlier this week. The Huskies entered Monday’s meet with the Utes in an identical place to Arizona, not having damaged the 197 mark all season, but the Huskies mustered their greatest displaying of the 12 months to make it a nail-biter of a meet till the Utes lastly locked down a 197.95-197.275 win.

However right here is the factor, the Utes aren’t the one ones dealing with harder than anticipated competitors, it’s occurring in all places.

With simply three weeks left within the common season, lower than .5 separates the highest 4 groups with Michigan in No. 1 with a 197.92 nationwide qualifying rating adopted by Oklahoma )197.64), Florida (197.63) and Utah (197.515) whereas Auburn (197.375), LSU (197.36) and Alabama (197.355) aren’t far behind.

Following these, one other 10 groups have NQS scores within the 196 vary.

It’s all coming collectively to make the postseason essentially the most entertaining but.

From what the Utes have seen, getting out of the Pac-12 with none extra losses will probably be a problem sufficient, a lot much less advancing from regionals to the NCAA Championships.

So what can we count on? Here’s a take a look at how issues are shaping up because the season winds down.

Michigan has confirmed it’s NCAA title final 12 months wasn’t a one-off because it has had an unbelievable season, scoring 197.6 or larger in each meet, together with a 198.525.

Oklahoma and Florida are two skilled groups that all the time appear to seek out their manner into the nationwide title image and this 12 months is not any totally different.

The Utes beat the Sooners 197.775-196.65 within the second meet of the 12 months. Since then, the Sooners have scored 198 or larger in three of the final 5 meets, so Oklahoma is wanting just like the workforce that received nationwide titles in 2014, 2016, 2017 and 2019.

Florida appears to be like to be the tops of the SEC, significantly after defeating LSU 198.15-197.825, however don’t depend the Tigers out as they’re an skilled workforce accustomed to competing within the postseason. Auburn and Alabama are proper there, too, particularly with Auburn’s Suni Lee being the most effective within the all-around the final 4 meets.

The Olympian hasn’t scored lower than 39.575 within the final 4 meets and earned an 39.825 towards LSU.

Minnesota (196.865), Missouri (196.79) and Denver (196.64) are different groups that shouldn’t be counted out of the postseason as they’ve the potential of an upset or two. Missouri already scored one upset, beating LSU final week.

Nearer to house, the Pac-12 has been fascinating for the presence of sure groups and the dearth of others.

Utah is at the moment the one Pac-12 workforce within the Prime 10, however the lack of different groups is deceptive. UCLA has been some of the inconsistent groups, scoring within the 197s one night time, 196 the opposite and 195 the subsequent, but when the Bruins can get previous the workforce distractions they might be a think about April.

Cal doesn’t have the three obligatory street scores to be counted within the NQS, however the Bears confirmed with their 197.525-197.275 win over Utah they intend to be within the postseason combine.

Washington appears to be like prefer it’s a workforce that’s discovering its profitable kind underneath first-year coach Jen Llewellyn, and Stanford and Arizona State are hanging round as nicely.

The Wildcats, Utah’s opponent on Friday, have scored 196 or larger of their final three conferences. These sorts of scores shouldn’t be sufficient to make them a lot of a menace for the Utes. However this season, all the things must be thought of and nothing might be discounted.