Utah sexual violence prevention advocates make final push as legislative session nears the end


Danica Baird, proper, outlines proposed payments through the Utah Coalition Towards Sexual Assault’s advocacy day on Tuesday on the state Capitol in Salt Lake Metropolis. (Jacob Scholl, KSL.com)

Estimated learn time: 3-4 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Although the 2022 Utah Legislature is nearing its conclusion, sexual assault prevention advocates imagine there’s nonetheless time to move significant laws to assist the state’s survivors.

On Tuesday, the Utah Coalition Towards Sexual Assault held an advocacy day on the Hill within the hopes of training legislators and members of the general public on what they will do assist finish sexual violence in Utah.

Rape is the one sort of violent crime in Utah that’s larger than the nationwide common, primarily based on the 2019 FBI uniform crime statistics, the coalition stated. For different crimes like murder and theft, Utah has decrease charges than the nationwide common.

These numbers are a lot larger in marginalized communities, in line with Sonya Martinez-Ortiz, the chief director for Salt Lake Metropolis’s Rape Restoration Middle. She stated over 56% of Native People have been victims of sexual violence, and over 20% of Black ladies have been victims of rape.

Liliana Olvera-Arbon, government director of the coalition, instructed KSL.com that 1 in 3 ladies in Utah will expertise some kind of sexual violence of their lifetime, as in comparison with the nationwide common of 1 in 4 ladies experiencing some kind of sexual violence.

“These numbers are gaining, they’re getting greater, they’re rising,” Olvera-Arbon stated Tuesday. “And so we’ve to do one thing.”

Danica Baird, an legal professional and board member on the Utah Coalition Towards Sexual Assault, outlined quite a few payments through the occasion that it hopes will likely be handed earlier than the session formally ends on Friday.

She pointed to items of laws like HB126, which might require the Division of Juvenile Justice Companies to create guidelines and procedures for reporting, stopping and responding to sexual assaults in its services and would carry the state’s juvenile system in compliance with the federal Jail Rape Elimination Act of 2003.

As of Tuesday, the invoice — launched by Rep. Angela Romero, D-Salt Lake Metropolis — was positioned on the Senate’s second studying calendar after passing out of the Senate Enterprise and Labor Committee. It was unanimously handed within the Home on Jan. 28.

One other invoice the coalition hopes will likely be enacted into regulation is HB352, which might require on-line relationship companies to offer and direct individuals to assets if on-line customers are assaulted, Baird stated. The invoice would additionally require on-line relationship companies that don’t conduct background checks on customers to inform their customers that others on the web service haven’t been vetted.

The invoice, additionally launched by Romero, had handed the Home on Friday and had handed the Senate Authorities Operations and Political Subdivisions Committee.

The coalition additionally backed HB228, which eliminates the requirement that sexual assault survivors should cooperate with regulation enforcement to be eligible to obtain advantages from the Utah Workplace for Victims of Crime. The invoice — introduced by Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan — handed each the Senate and the Home and was despatched for enrolling Tuesday.

Olvera-Arbon stated HB228 is a big step ahead, as some survivors of sexual assault will not be snug coming ahead. However the invoice would permit for therapeutic help and disaster help, which she stated is crucial for the therapeutic course of to start. She additionally hoped for a yearly appropriation quantity of $3 million from the legislature.

“We have gotten actually constructive interplay about these payments, we’re hoping most of them will move,” Olvera-Arbon stated.

Friday will mark the forty fifth and closing day of the 2022 Utah legislative session.

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Prince Andrew Served With Sexual Abuse Lawsuit Filed By Virginia Giuffre


Prince Andrew, Duke of York, has been served with a sexual assault lawsuit filed towards him by considered one of Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers, in response to New York federal court docket data.

Andrew is being sued within the US District Courtroom for the Southern District of New York by Virginia Giuffre, 38, who alleges the duke sexually abused her on a number of events in New York, London, and on Epstein’s personal island within the US Virgin Islands between 2000 and 2002 when she was below the age of 18.

The duke has repeatedly denied having intercourse with Giuffre, most notably in a disastrous November 2019 BBC interview through which he tried to defend himself, claiming to have by no means met her. Shortly after the interview aired, Andrew introduced that he was “stepping again” from royal public duties.

The affidavit of service filed Friday states {that a} member of Andrew’s safety crew formally acquired discover of the lawsuit towards him at his house, Royal Lodge on the grounds of Windsor Fort, on Aug. 27.

Within the affidavit, Cesar Augusto Sepulveda mentioned that it took him two days to ship the paperwork as a result of on his first try on Aug. 26, Andrew’s safety crew instructed him that they’d been instructed to not settle for service of any court docket course of or “enable anybody attending there for the aim of serving court docket course of onto the grounds of the property.”

When he returned the following day, Sepulveda met with Andrew’s head of safety, who instructed him he may go away the paperwork with one of many Royal Lodge guards and they’d be forwarded to the duke’s authorized crew. The pinnacle of safety refused to permit Sepulveda to serve Andrew in individual.

The paperwork record London-based prison protection legal professional Gary Bloxsome because the duke’s lawyer. BuzzFeed Information reached out to Bloxsome for touch upon the affidavit of service and the doc’s declare that his safety crew had been instructed to not obtain court docket paperwork. He didn’t reply.

Nonetheless, in response to ABC Information, Bloxsome reportedly questioned the legality of the service and known as Giuffre’s authorized crew’s actions “regrettable” in a letter obtained by the community. Within the doc, which ABC Information mentioned was despatched by Bloxsome to British judicial official senior grasp Barbara Fontaine on Sept. 6, the lawyer claimed that the best way through which the lawsuit was served makes the service invalid below British legislation.

“Absent being glad of some excellent cause to take action, our shopper is extremely unlikely to be ready to comply with any type of various service whereas the method to service of those proceedings stays irregular and the viability of the declare stays open to doubt,” Bloxsome reportedly wrote.

The primary pretrial convention will happen just about through phone on Monday. It’s unclear whether or not legal professionals representing Andrew will take part in any respect, as no paperwork have been filed in federal court docket in his protection.

Pentagon Opens Probe Into Sexual Abuse by U.S. Allies in Afghanistan | The Dancing Boys of Afghanistan | FRONTLINE | PBS


The Protection Division’s Inspector Common’s workplace has opened an investigation into whether or not United States troopers have been discouraged from reporting the rape and sexual abuse of youngsters by their Afghan allies.

The investigation, introduced on Tuesday, comes 5 weeks after a New York Occasions report on American troopers who mentioned they have been advised to disregard when Afghan militia commanders and native police abused or raped younger youngsters — a observe identified in Afghanistan as bacha bazi, which interprets to “boy play.”

The investigation discovered that some U.S. troopers — like Capt. Dan Quinn and Sgt. 1st Class Charles Martland — confronted disciplinary actions after disobeying what they mentioned was an unwritten rule within the navy to disregard the abuse. Each males acquired right into a struggle in 2011 with an Afghan police commander who allegedly saved a boy chained to his mattress as a intercourse slave. The Military relieved Quinn of his command after the incident. It additionally sought to forcibly retire Martland, in line with The Occasions. 

U.S. and coalition forces and the federal government of Afghanistan have relied on militias and highly effective warlords within the struggle in opposition to the Taliban, generally regardless of accusations of human rights violations or different legal exercise. The coverage of nonintervention within the case of kid abuse, was meant to keep up good relations with these allies.

In September, when the Occasions report was revealed, a spokesman for the American command in Afghanistan advised the newspaper that “allegations of kid sexual abuse by Afghan navy or police personnel can be a matter of home Afghan legal legislation.”

In a discover on Tuesday, the inspector basic’s workplace mentioned its probe would give attention to U.S. coverage surrounding allegations of kid intercourse abuse by Afghan safety forces, and whether or not there was any “steerage, casual or in any other case, to discourage reporting” such abuse.

The workplace mentioned it additionally plans to research what number of circumstances have been reported to U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan, what motion was taken in these circumstances, and what coaching has been given on how one can establish and reply to allegations of kid intercourse abuse.

FRONTLINE’s 2010 investigation, The Dancing Boys of Afghanistan, discovered that bacha bazi, which was banned below the Taliban, had secretly been revived, although it stays unlawful in Afghanistan. Journalist Najibullah Quraishi discovered highly effective Afghan males, a few of them warlords or former militia commanders who fought the Taliban, partaking within the observe. They’d give the households of the boys cash in change for taking them and coaching them to “entertain” rich retailers and warlords.

Whereas a police chief advised Quraishi that anybody caught practising bacha bazi can be “severely punished,” Quraishi later discovered cops and investigators at events watching the boys dance.

FRONTLINE takes viewers contained in the war-torn nation to disclose a disturbing observe that’s as soon as once more flourishing within the nation — the organized sexual abuse of adolescent boys.


Priyanka Boghani

Priyanka Boghani, Deputy Digital Editor, FRONTLINE



Art Briles, Who Coached Baylor During Sexual Assault Scandal, Is Hired at Grambling State


Artwork Briles, the previous Baylor soccer coach who was fired in 2016 after a college investigation discovered that he and different coaches botched sexual assault accusations levied towards soccer gamers, was employed Thursday as Grambling State College’s offensive coordinator, college officers stated.

Briles had not coached in faculty soccer since his ousting from Baylor, however he was the top soccer coach at Mount Vernon Excessive College in Texas earlier than resigning in 2020. Briles, 66, additionally coached soccer in Florence, Italy, in 2018.

Briles’s hiring at Louisiana’s Grambling State, one of the vital in style traditionally Black schools in america, instantly raised questions on this system’s tradition below Hue Jackson, the previous Cleveland Browns head coach who was employed to steer the college’s soccer program in December.

Brian Howard, a spokesman for the athletic division, stated it will not formally announce the hiring of Briles or talk about its causes for bringing him again into faculty soccer. Howard added that Briles was interviewed by a reporter from an area tv station and mentioned a number of the controversy surrounding his time at Baylor. The phase that includes Briles was scheduled to air on Thursday night.

The sexual assault scandal marred Baylor for a lot of the 2010s as its soccer program introduced thousands and thousands of {dollars} to the college. A damning report by an outdoor legislation agency included quite a few sexual assault allegations towards soccer gamers — accusations that have been typically deliberately not reported to the correct authorities. The investigation discovered that Baylor instituted “a cultural notion that soccer was above the principles.”

In response, the college’s president, Kenneth Starr, was demoted to chancellor and finally departed. The athletic director, Ian McCaw, who now holds the identical place at Liberty College, resigned. And Briles was fired.

The college reached settlements with a number of ladies who reported harassment or assault and introduced claims below Title IX, the federal legislation that prohibits discrimination on the premise of intercourse at universities.

Final yr, nonetheless, the N.C.A.A. dominated that Baylor didn’t violate its guidelines when it did not report the sexual assault allegations, regardless of even the college’s personal acknowledgment of repeated errors surrounding the scandals. A committee wrote that the allegations towards members of Baylor’s soccer program, a few of which led to felony circumstances and convictions, didn’t solely have an effect on student-athletes, and as a substitute passed off in a “campuswide tradition of sexual violence.” As a result of the allegations weren’t restricted to only student-athletes, the committee concluded that it couldn’t punish the college for a violation of N.C.A.A. guidelines.

After the firing, Briles apologized and acknowledged that he “made errors.” He stated that in hindsight, he would have dealt with issues in a different way at Baylor, the place he had a 65-37 document and took a as soon as insignificant program to 2 Large 12 championships.

In 2017, the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Soccer League employed Briles as an assistant coach, however lower than 24 hours later, after receiving widespread public backlash, they reneged and introduced that he wouldn’t be a part of the staff.