‘Salty’ and ‘fighting,’ BYU looks toward WCC Tourney opener — with key rematch in view


Brigham Younger Cougars guard Spencer Johnson (20), left, high-fives Jackson Parcell, 5, after Brigham Younger Cougars wins over Loyola Marymount Lions in an NCAA basketball sport at Marriott Middle in Provo on Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. (Mengshin Lin, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 6-7 minutes

PROVO — Even with out admitting it publicly, you might inform Spencer Johnson has spent the previous month excited about the loss at Pacific.

His teammates have, too, even when the BYU males’s basketball crew has lengthy moved previous the 76-73 loss to Pacific that was the low level of the season, the Cougars’ solely Quad 4 lack of the Mark Pope period and the largest blemish on an in any other case NCAA Event-caliber resume.

However with 54 seconds left in Stockton, California, Alex Barcello drained a 3-pointer that pulled the Cougars inside 2 factors — with all of the momentum.

However BYU may get no nearer. What adopted was a mini-tragedy of errors, that includes three steals and two turnovers — to not point out 4 free throws — within the remaining 41 seconds as BYU fell 76-73, the primary time in Pope’s three years that the Cougars have failed to reply from a loss with a win.

“We simply did not actually have any vitality,” mentioned Johnson, talking publicly for the primary time concerning the Jan. 29 loss. “Everyone hits a degree within the season within the trenches of January and February the place it will get long and hard; you are within the grind, and typically it is easy to lose vitality and lose focus.

“We simply did not have a ton of struggle. Clearly, it confirmed; we did not play very properly. We could not get stops. I believe it will likely be totally different this time round if we performed them.”

That loss changed into three, which then grew to become 4, when San Francisco and Gonzaga got here to the Marriott Middle to cap off the longest dropping skid of the Mark Pope period. It is that skid that has BYU opening the West Coast Convention Event sooner than it ever has earlier than, a 7 p.m. MST tipoff Friday because the No. 5 seed.

The Cougars’ opponent that evening? It might be Loyola Marymount, which BYU has performed — and crushed — twice within the remaining three weeks of the common season, because of the WCC’s unbalanced schedule. Or it might be Pacific, that very same crew that handed the Cougars the loss on a bizarre weekend evening in a health club shut down for a prolonged delay as a result of the Tigers could not shut off an inadvertent shot clock.

Johnson will take both matchup Friday — he is aware of that a very powerful factor is to win that gameand advance to face San Francisco, at the moment ranked No. 28 within the NET and a Quad 1 neutral-site sport with potential NCAA Event implications Saturday evening on the Orleans Enviornment.

Pepperdine Waves guard Houston Mallette (0) drives against Brigham Young Cougars guard Spencer Johnson (20) during the game at the Marriott Center in Provo on Saturday, Feb. 26, 2022.
Pepperdine Waves guard Houston Mallette (0) drives towards Brigham Younger Cougars guard Spencer Johnson (20) through the sport on the Marriott Middle in Provo on Saturday, Feb. 26, 2022. (Photograph: Spenser Heaps, Deseret Information)

However deep down, even with out absolutely admitting, it is easy to inform this crew desires one other crack at Pacific.

“It would not matter to me,” Johnson mentioned, earlier than slyly including, “however it could be good to play Pacific once more; that may be enjoyable. A redemption sport.”

Past that stretch, he additionally feels just like the Cougars have corrected a lot of their points from the skid. Johnson has been a key purpose why, too, coming off the bench in all 29 video games he is performed to common 5.8 factors, 3.0 rebounds and 1.0 assists per sport in lower than 20 minutes.

The Salt Lake Group School switch who prepped at close by American Fork has scored in double figures eight instances this season, together with a career-high 15 factors on Dec. 1 towards Utah Valley. However he is been greater than a scorer, taking pictures 45% from the sector and sometimes being one of many first gamers off the bench as Pope turns to his 6-foot-5 body as a part of his prolonged defensive lineup.

An enormous a part of Johnson’s sport, by his personal admission, includes “ensuring we’re locked in defensively” and main the Cougars’ ball-screen protection and defensive rotations.

There’s some saltiness to his sport; and proper now, Pope admits there’s a number of saltiness amongst his crew that is aware of it must win not less than two video games in Las Vegas to have any probability of an NCAA Event bid.

“We had some guys that had been salty; that made me actually glad,” Pope mentioned after Tuesday’s follow within the Marriott Middle. “That is how it’s important to be as we translate this into tomorrow and Thursday and an enormous sport on Friday.

“However that is what we wish. I believe the blokes have some juice proper now. It makes me excited.”

Get to that Monday semifinal, the place BYU would face top-ranked Gonzaga for a 3rd time, and something can occur. The Cougars (21-9, 9-6 WCC) could be large underdogs in Sin Metropolis, however they had been a yr in the past when dealing with the Bulldogs within the match title sport on the Orleans Enviornment.

BYU had then-unbeaten Gonzaga on the ropes that evening, utilizing an 11-0 run within the first half to construct up a 12-point halftime lead. However Jalen Suggs scored 23 factors, together with two late 3-pointers, to rally the Zags to the win towards a fellow NCAA Event crew, 88-78.

“Gonzaga was actually good final yr, too, huh?” Johnson recalled pensively. “I hope we get to play them once more this yr; I actually do.

“Our crew is totally different this yr than it was final yr, and now we have a number of guys which are able to tackle that problem, to compete and struggle with them. The 2 instances we performed them this yr have not been nice video games; they’ve blown us out. However I believe if we get them once more, we will be prepared. The expertise from final yr teaches us that we are able to have a 10-12 lead at halftime, and us returning guys hope we get to play them once more. It will be a 40-minute sport, and we will get after them.”

Harm notes

Seneca Knight didn’t follow in full Tuesday afternoon as he continues to recuperate from a wrist damage suffered two weeks in the past at Saint Mary’s. However the junior switch from San Jose State put up photographs with the crew in each practices this week as he works again into type, Pope mentioned.

“He is doing good,” Pope mentioned. “It is simply form of a day-by-day factor that we’ll see.”

With out Knight, the Cougars have trimmed the common rotation to simply eight gamers, together with Caleb Lohner and Fousseyni Traore — who proceed to recuperate from nagging accidents suffered through the yr.

It is one purpose why BYU did not schedule a make-up sport towards a Quad 1 nonconference opponent this week that might have been added when the league opener towards Portland was canceled attributable to COVID-19. The Cougars had a sport tentatively aligned for Monday, however did not really feel taking part in on a fast turnaround from Saturday evening — and never practising Sunday — with a flight to the opposite crew’s campus made sense for his or her present place.

“That is the place you might be on this a part of the season,” Pope mentioned. “That is why it is a lot enjoyable.

“While you get to that second, you are battered and crushed, with photographs at your confidence, strife in your locker room; that is while you stroll into the largest second — as a result of it’s important to battle by all these things. It is an unimaginable expertise for our guys to develop.

“The postseason, there’s nothing prefer it.”

Postseason awards

The West Coast Convention will launch its annual postseason awards Wednesday morning, a convention spokesman mentioned. The honors are voted on yearly by the league’s 10 coaches.

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‘I wake up with sweaty palms’ — How Ukrainian Latter-day Saints are fighting fear with faith and food storage


Katia Serdyuk rose earlier than daybreak Feb. 24, simply as she had each morning, squeezing in just a few hours of labor as a translator for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints whereas the world was nonetheless quiet.

Quickly, she knew, the home would buzz together with her daughter and son-in-law and their 4 kids, whom she shared a home with in Ukraine’s capital of Kyiv. However for just a few pre-dawn hours, she was free to commit her consideration solely to verb conjugations and sentence constructions.

Besides it wasn’t her grandchildren who broke her focus that morning. The household was nonetheless asleep when, round 5 a.m., bombs exploded overhead.

“It was horrifying,” she mentioned. “It was so loud and early within the morning.”

Within the hours and days which have adopted Russia’s invasion, Serdyuk, who was baptized into the LDS Church in 1996, mentioned Ukrainian Latter-day Saints have banded collectively, tapping their shut ties and preexisting help constructions to assist strengthen each other amid the escalating violence.

(Alexandra Vyshneva) Katia Serdyuk poses in entrance of the Kyiv Temple. Baptized in 1996, she says regardless of concern for his or her households, native Latter-day Saints have turned to at least one one other for help and luxury.

“We name one another and attempt to discover out who wants assist,” she mentioned, “particularly the aged and people with younger kids.”

Interviews with eight Ukrainian Latter-day Saints recommend Serdyuk and her congregation are removed from the anomaly. Time and again, these members from the besieged nation cited their church group as enjoying a pivotal position as nightly raids topple buildings and Russian troops encroach on their cities and neighborhoods.

‘We’re not panicking’

Marina and Bogdon Pryshcheupchuk dwell with their 16-year-old son in Bila Tserkva, a metropolis 50 miles southwest of Kyiv. Because the invasion started, they mentioned their Latter-day Saint congregation has been speaking “always” by a bunch chat, sharing information, inquiring after each other, and pooling assets — together with meals, drugs, cash and underground shelter.

“We’re not panicking,” mentioned Bogdon, including that the congregation had gone as far as to create a turn-based system of prayer. That means, an hour by no means goes by with out somebody within the congregation supplicating on behalf of the others and the nation.

Each agreed that contributing to this sense of calm was the truth that their congregation had obtained and adopted instruction from native leaders two months previous to retailer up essential provides as a congregation. On the similar time, every household was advised to create an emergency suitcase with important paperwork along with sufficient meals and water to carry their family over for at the very least 72 hours.

“We had been making ready at full pace,” Marina mentioned.

Marina and Bogdon Pryshcheupchuk in Bila Tserkva. The photograph was taken on her birthday, Feb. 23, 2022. The bombing started the subsequent morning.

Rostyslav Lukach and his spouse, Maryna, dwell with their canine and cat in a suburb of Kyiv. Till the second the bombing started, the previous enterprise college professor had remained skeptical that Russian President Vladimir Putin would comply with by on his threats to invade. Waking as much as the explosions Thursday morning, he felt stunned and “very nervous.”

The subsequent day, native Latter-day Saint leaders despatched a textual content asking all the lads within the congregation to achieve out to the people they had been assigned to minister to and decide who wanted assist with meals and procuring.

When Lukach contacted the 2 widows assigned to him, he mentioned he discovered them in a great temper. “We laughed and joked and supported one another. Truly,” he chuckled. “They tried to help me.”

Church help from overseas

Help from fellow Latter-day Saints hasn’t been restricted to space congregations.

“All of the missionaries that served in Ukraine preserve sending help and prayers,” Bogdon Pryshcheupchuk mentioned. Then, chatting with the church’s normal membership, he added: “Your prayers and fasts are actually useful now.”

Sergei and Ludmila, who requested that their final names not be used out of concern for his or her security, have been significantly grateful for the help they’ve obtained from Latter-day Saints dwelling in Utah.

Fearing battle, the couple left their house within the Ukrainian metropolis of Zhytomyr in January for California, their three kids in tow. They rapidly realized, nevertheless, that they couldn’t afford the price of hire and accepted a proposal from the dad and mom of the missionary who, in 2016, had taught and baptized Sergei to remain of their house in Kaysville.

Since they’ve arrived, they mentioned they’ve obtained help from native Latter-day Saints starting from fundamentals like meals and furnishings to cash whereas Sergei applies for political asylum and secures the documentation wanted to work in the USA.

“We wish to thank the LDS group in Utah for his or her help and their love,” Ludmila mentioned. “It will have been a lot tougher with out this help.”

For Serdyuk, maybe essentially the most significant outreach has come from Russian Latter-day Saints. As a volunteer administrator for an academic program designed for college-age members, generally known as BYU–Pathway Worldwide, she mentioned she’s repeatedly in touch with Latter-day Saint college students from Moscow and Siberia. The day after the bombing started, she discovered herself in a gathering with a lot of them.

“I simply couldn’t take a look at them like my enemies,” she mentioned.

The sensation was mutual. Nearly instantly, the youthful Russian attendees started to precise concern and apologize for the circumstances now dealing with Serdyuk and her individuals.

“They usually had been honest,” she mentioned. “I may really feel that.”

‘Why ought to I’m going?’

Mariya Manzhos grew up in Kyiv however left Ukraine in 2002 to attend Brigham Younger College. She now lives in Boston together with her husband and three kids, although her dad and mom and different household stay in Kyiv.

“I’ve been shaking,” she mentioned. “I get up with sweaty palms, scared to have a look at my cellphone.”

She, too, expressed gratitude for the “outpouring of help” from worldwide members of the religion, particularly former missionaries to Ukraine.

Mariya Manzhos, second from proper, and her husband, Zachary Davis, pose together with her dad and mom on their marriage ceremony day in entrance of the Kyiv Temple. The couple now dwell in Boston with their three kids, however Manzhos has remained in fixed communication for the reason that begin of the invasion together with her dad and mom, who stay in Kyiv.

“My dad and mom had been simply telling me,” she mentioned, “how moved they had been with simply how many individuals are providing shelter and welcoming them to return to the USA.”

In contrast to the Pryshcheupchuks, nevertheless, her dad and mom don’t plan to go wherever.

“A part of me is heartbroken,” she mentioned, “however a part of me is like, I get it. There’s one thing highly effective about staying in your house and together with your individuals throughout turbulent occasions.”

Now all that’s left, she mentioned, is to hope and belief.

“My dad and mom have mentioned a number of occasions that they’re attempting to depend on religion and prayer, to think about Christ and be sturdy,” she mentioned. “I feel in moments like this, when issues are out of your management, that’s if you actually depend on religion.”

Rosytslav Lukach doesn’t see himself packing up both — irrespective of how harmful issues get.

“It’s my nation,” he mentioned. “It’s my land. Why ought to I’m going?”

Within the meantime, he mentioned, he feels hopeful, a sense he attributed to his religion.

“Data of the Lord Jesus Christ’s holy plan is and was and at all times can be essential to my spouse’s and my optimism,” he mentioned. “That’s the core.”

The church’s response

The Utah-based church confirmed Monday that it “doesn’t have any overseas full-time missionaries in Russia,” explaining that as of mid-February, roughly 50 “volunteers” had taken assignments elsewhere.

The church moved its full-time missionaries out of Ukraine in January because of the rising tensions, quickly reassigning them to different elements of Europe.

The religion’s governing First Presidency issued an announcement the day after the invasion started calling for peace.

“We pray that this armed battle will finish rapidly, that the controversies will finish peacefully and that peace will prevail amongst nations and inside our personal hearts,” the discharge learn. “We plead with world leaders to hunt for such resolutions and peace.”

Church spokesperson Sam Penrod confirmed that the Latter-day Saint temple in Kyiv had closed.

Greater than 11,000 Latter-day Saints dwell in Ukraine, based on the church’s web site. The church doesn’t record its statistics for Russia, although it reportedly had about 23,000 members there in 2018 scattered amongst almost 100 congregations.

Pride Was A Riot — And LGBTQ Demonstrators Around The World Are Still Fighting For Equality


The primary Delight marches had been held in 1970, a 12 months after the Stonewall riots in New York Metropolis. During the last 50 years, Delight has turned from a solemn response to police brutality and discrimination towards the LGBTQ group right into a celebration of what it means to be queer.

Rights for the LGBTQ group in america have come a good distance — however that is not the case in all places on the earth.

Individuals’s rights are nonetheless quashed by anti-LGBTQ governments, and in international locations like Iran, Myanmar, and Uganda, being homosexual remains to be thought of unlawful.

We checked out 10 years of Delight marches world wide to remind ourselves that, for many individuals, Delight remains to be a riot.

Study questions the role of vitamin D2 in human health but its sibling, vitamin D3, could be important for fighting infections — ScienceDaily


New analysis has discovered vital variations between the 2 varieties of vitamin D, with vitamin D2 having a questionable influence on human well being. Nevertheless, the research discovered that vitamin D3 may stability individuals’s immune methods and assist strengthen defences in opposition to viral infections resembling Covid-19.

In a collaborative research by the Universities of Surrey and Brighton, researchers investigated the influence of vitamin D dietary supplements — D2 and D3 — taken every day over a 12-week interval on the exercise of genes in individuals’s blood.

Opposite to extensively held views, the analysis group found that each varieties of vitamin D did not have the identical impact. They discovered proof that vitamin D3 had a modifying impact on the immune system that would fortify the physique in opposition to viral and bacterial ailments.

Professor Colin Smith, lead-author of the research from the College of Surrey, who started this work whereas on the College of Brighton, stated:

“We now have proven that vitamin D3 seems to stimulate the sort I interferon signalling system within the physique — a key a part of the immune system that gives a primary line of defence in opposition to micro organism and viruses. Thus, a wholesome vitamin D3 standing could assist stop viruses and micro organism from gaining a foothold within the physique.

“Our research means that it will be significant that individuals take a vitamin D3 complement, or suitably fortified meals, particularly within the winter months.”

Though some meals are fortified with vitamin D, like some breakfast cereals, yoghurts, and bread, few naturally comprise the vitamin. Vitamin D3 is produced naturally within the pores and skin from publicity to daylight or synthetic ultraviolet UVB mild, whereas some crops and fungi produce vitamin D2.

Many individuals have inadequate ranges of vitamin D3 as a result of they dwell in places the place daylight is proscribed within the winter, just like the UK. The Covid-19 pandemic has additionally restricted individuals’s pure publicity to the solar attributable to individuals spending extra time of their properties.

Professor Susan Lanham-New, co-author of the research and Head of the Division of Dietary Sciences on the College of Surrey, stated:

“Whereas we discovered that vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 shouldn’t have the identical impact on gene exercise inside people, the dearth of influence we discovered when vitamin D2 implies that a bigger research is urgently required to make clear the variations within the results. Nevertheless, these outcomes present that vitamin D3 needs to be the favoured type for fortified meals and dietary supplements.”

The research is printed in Frontiers in Immunology.

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Supplies supplied by College of Surrey. Observe: Content material could also be edited for model and size.

Kyiv residential tower hit by missile as fighting rages: Mayor | Russia-Ukraine crisis News


House constructing comes below assault in Ukraine’s capital on third day of Russia’s invasion.

The mayor of Kiyv says a missile has hit an condominium constructing in Ukraine’s capital, as preventing between Ukrainian and invading Russian forces raged – however no deaths or accidents had been instantly reported.

Vitali Klitschko mentioned emergency and rescue companies had rushed to the scene after the missile slammed into the residential tower block on the southwestern outskirts of Kyiv, close to Zhuliany airport, on Saturday.

He posted a picture on a messaging app, displaying a gaping gap on one aspect of the constructing that ravaged flats on a number of storeys.

Klitschko urged Kyiv residents to remain in shelters. “The enemy will assault from the air,” he warned.

Reporting from Kyiv, Al Jazeera’s Andrew Simmons mentioned the high-rise construction was one of many “many buildings” that had been hit in a single day.

“The degrees of violence raining down from the sky, by way of the streets of this metropolis, it’s reaching its highest degree,” he mentioned. “Crescendos of sounds, crescendos of concern,” he added, as “the clock is ticking on the following stage of this Russian invasion, which is an try to take the capital.”

‘One other evening below assaults’

The Russian navy mentioned on Saturday it had focused Ukraine’s navy infrastructure utilizing cruise missiles fired from the air and sea.

Klitschko mentioned that as of 6am native time (04:00 GMT), 35 individuals, together with two youngsters, had been wounded in in a single day preventing. It was not clear if he was referring solely to civilians.

He insisted that there have been no common Russian troops in Kyiv, however mentioned they had been attempting to enter from a number of instructions and added that saboteur teams had been “energetic”.

Dmytro Kuleba, Ukraine’s international minister, posted an image on Twitter of the broken condominium block.

“Kyiv, our splendid, peaceable metropolis, survived one other evening below assaults by Russian floor forces, missiles. One in all them has hit a residential condominium in Kyiv,” he wrote.

He known as on the worldwide neighborhood to “totally isolate Russia, expel ambassadors, (introduce an) oil embargo, break its economic system”.

“Cease Russian warfare criminals!” he added.



Street fighting begins in Ukrainian capital Kiev : NPR


KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian troops stormed towards Ukraine’s capital early Saturday, and avenue preventing broke out as metropolis officers urged residents to take shelter. The nation’s president refused an American supply to evacuate, insisting that he would keep. “The struggle is right here,” he mentioned.

The clashes adopted two days of preventing that resulted in a whole bunch of casualties and pummeled bridges, colleges and house buildings. U.S. officers consider Russian President Vladimir Putin is decided to overthrow Ukraine’s authorities and change it with a regime of his personal.

The assault represented Putin’s boldest effort but to redraw the world map and revive Moscow’s Chilly Battle-era affect. It triggered new worldwide efforts to finish the invasion, together with direct sanctions on Putin.

As his nation confronted explosions and gunfire, and because the destiny of Kyiv hung within the steadiness, Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskyy appealed for a cease-fire and warned in a bleak assertion that a number of cities have been underneath assault.

“This night time we’ve to face agency,” he mentioned. “The destiny of Ukraine is being determined proper now.”

Zelenskyy was urged to evacuate Kyiv on the behest of the U.S. authorities however turned down the supply, in response to a senior American intelligence official with direct information of the dialog. The official quoted the president as saying that “the struggle is right here” and that he wanted anti-tank ammunition however “not a journey.”

Metropolis officers in Kyiv urged residents to take shelter, to avoid home windows and to take precautions to keep away from flying particles or bullets.

The Kremlin accepted Kyiv’s supply to carry talks, nevertheless it gave the impression to be an effort to squeeze concessions out of the embattled Zelenskyy as an alternative of a gesture towards a diplomatic answer.

The Russian army continued its advance, laying declare Friday to the southern Ukraine metropolis of Melitopol. Nonetheless, it was unclear within the fog of conflict how a lot of Ukraine remains to be underneath Ukrainian management and the way a lot or little Russian forces have seized.

As preventing continued, Ukraine’s army reported capturing down an II-76 Russian transport airplane carrying paratroopers close to Vasylkiv, a metropolis 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Kyiv, an account confirmed by a senior American intelligence official. It was unclear what number of have been on board. Transport planes can carry as much as 125 paratroopers.

A second Russian army transport airplane was shot down close to Bila Tserkva, 50 miles (85 kilometers) south of Kyiv, in response to two American officers with direct information of situations on the bottom in Ukraine.

The Russian army has not commented on both airplane.

The U.S. and different world powers slapped ever-tougher sanctions on Russia because the invasion reverberated by means of the world’s financial system and vitality provides, threatening to additional hit unusual households. U.N. officers mentioned thousands and thousands may flee Ukraine. Sports activities leagues moved to punish Russia and even the favored Eurovision music contest banned it from the Could finals in Italy.

By means of all of it, Russia remained unbowed, vetoing a U.N. Safety Council decision demanding that it cease attacking Ukraine and withdraw troops instantly. The veto was anticipated, however the U.S. and its supporters argued that the hassle would spotlight Moscow’s worldwide isolation. The 11-1 vote, with China, India and the United Arab Emirates abstaining, confirmed vital however not complete opposition to Russia’s invasion of its smaller, militarily weaker neighbor.

NATO, in the meantime, determined to ship elements of the alliance’s response pressure to assist defend its member nations within the east for the primary time. NATO didn’t say what number of troops can be deployed however added that it could contain land, sea and air energy.

Day Two of Russia’s invasion, the most important floor conflict in Europe since World Battle II, targeted on the Ukrainian capital, the place Related Press reporters heard explosions beginning earlier than daybreak. Gunfire was reported in a number of areas.

A big growth was heard within the night close to Maidan Nezalezhnosti, the sq. in central Kyiv that was the guts of protests which led to the 2014 ouster of a Kremlin-friendly president. The trigger was not instantly recognized.

5 explosions struck close to a significant energy plant on Kyiv’s japanese outskirts, mentioned Mayor Vitaly Klitschko. There was no info on what prompted them, and no electrical outages have been instantly reported.

It was unclear how many individuals general had died. Ukrainian officers reported not less than 137 deaths on their facet from the primary full day of preventing and claimed a whole bunch on the Russian one. Russian authorities launched no casualty figures.

U.N. officers reported 25 civilian deaths, largely from shelling and airstrikes, and mentioned that 100,000 individuals have been believed to have left their houses. They estimate that as much as 4 million may flee if the preventing escalates.

Zelenskyy tweeted that he and U.S. President Joe Biden spoke by cellphone and mentioned “strengthening sanctions, concrete protection help and an antiwar coalition.”

Late Friday, Biden signed a memo authorizing as much as $350 million in extra safety help to Ukraine, bringing the overall safety help accepted for Ukraine to $1 billion over the previous 12 months. It was not instantly clear how shortly the help would stream.

Zelenskyy’s whereabouts have been saved secret after Zelenskyy instructed European leaders in a name Thursday that he was Russia’s No. 1 goal — and that they may not see him once more alive. His workplace later launched a video of him standing with senior aides exterior the presidential workplace and saying that he and different authorities officers would keep within the capital.

Zelenskyy earlier provided to barter on a key Putin demand: that Ukraine declare itself impartial and abandon its ambition of becoming a member of NATO. The Kremlin mentioned Kyiv initially agreed to have talks in Minsk, then mentioned it could desire Warsaw and later halted communications. Russian International Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova mentioned later that Kyiv would focus on prospects for talks on Saturday.

The assault was anticipated for weeks by the U.S. and Western allies and denied to be within the works simply as lengthy by Putin. He argued the West left him with no different alternative by refusing to barter Russia’s safety calls for.

In a window into how the more and more remoted Putin views Ukraine and its management, he urged Ukraine’s army to give up, saying: “We might discover it simpler to agree with you than with that gang of drug addicts and neo-Nazis who’ve holed up in Kyiv and have taken the complete Ukrainian individuals hostage.”

Enjoying on Russian nostalgia for World Battle II heroism, the Kremlin equates members of Ukrainian right-wing teams with neo-Nazis. Zelenskyy, who’s Jewish, angrily dismisses these claims.

Putin has not disclosed his final plans for Ukraine. International Minister Sergey Lavrov gave a touch, saying, “We need to enable the Ukrainian individuals to find out its personal destiny.” Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov mentioned Russia acknowledges Zelenskyy because the president, however wouldn’t say how lengthy the Russian army operation may final.

Ukrainians abruptly adjusted to life underneath fireplace, after Russian forces invaded the nation from three sides as they massed an estimated 150,000 troops close by.

Residents of a Kyiv house constructing woke to screaming, smoke and flying mud. What the mayor recognized as Russian shelling tore off a part of the constructing and ignited a hearth.

“What are you doing? What is that this?” resident Yurii Zhyhanov requested Russian forces. Like numerous different Ukrainians, he grabbed what belongings he may, took his mom, and fled, automobile alarms wailing behind him.

Elsewhere in Kyiv, the physique of a lifeless soldier lay close to an underpass. Fragments of a downed plane smoked amid the brick houses of a residential space. Black plastic was draped over physique elements discovered beside them. Folks climbed out of bomb shelters, basements and subways to face one other day of upheaval.

“We’re all scared and apprehensive. We do not know what to do then, what is going on to occur in a couple of days,” mentioned Lucy Vashaka, 20, a employee at a small Kyiv lodge.

On the Pentagon, press secretary John Kirby mentioned the U.S. believes the offensive, together with its advance on Kiev, has gone extra slowly than Moscow had deliberate, noting that Ukraine forces have been preventing again. However he additionally mentioned the army marketing campaign is in an early stage and circumstances can change quickly.

The Biden administration mentioned Friday that it could transfer to freeze the belongings of Putin and Lavrov, following the European Union and Britain in instantly sanctioning prime Russian management.

Zakharova, the Russian International Ministry spokeswoman, referred to as the sanctions towards Putin and Lavrov “an instance and an illustration of a complete helplessness” of the West.

Russia-Ukraine fighting disrupts airline industry | Russia-Ukraine crisis News


The fallout to the worldwide aviation trade from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine unfold on Friday as two extra European nations banned Russian carriers and the European Union mentioned it could limit exports of plane components.

Virgin Atlantic and British Airways started routing flights round Russian airspace after London and Moscow banned one another’s airways in tit-for-tat retaliation over the Ukraine invasion.

Poland and the Czech Republic additionally mentioned they have been banning Russian airways from their airspace. Some trade leaders mentioned they have been ready for additional bans regardless of the prospect of a expensive sanctions battle over mutual overflight rights.

The governing council of the United Nations’ aviation company, the Worldwide Civil Aviation Group, was as a consequence of focus on the battle at a gathering on Friday.

Russia’s invasion has “important potential to derail the delicate airline restoration in Europe”, mentioned Rob Morris, chief marketing consultant at UK-based Ascend by Cirium.

Whereas many airways are nonetheless utilizing Russia’s east-west transit corridors, some have begun asking about capability in Anchorage, paying homage to Alaska’s Chilly Battle use as a refuelling hub for jets barred from Soviet airspace.

Western airways, lessors and producers have been assessing the rising dangers of doing enterprise with Russia as sanctions focused Russian corporations, banks and people.

Delta Air Traces mentioned it was suspending a codesharing service with Russia’s Aeroflot.

“It is going to be harder for buyers to simply accept portfolios of plane property containing Russian airways. No person desires to take Russian danger at present,” aviation adviser Bertrand Grabowski mentioned, including that fears included an absence of insurance coverage protection.

Russian forces have been closing on Ukraine’s capital on Friday within the greatest assault on a European state since World Battle II.

Airspace in Ukraine, Moldova, components of Belarus and in southern Russia close to the Ukraine border has been closed, giving airways a narrower vary of routing choices.

Japan Airways on Thursday cancelled a flight to Moscow, citing potential security dangers, and the UK closed its airspace to Russian airways, together with Aeroflot, as a part of a raft of punitive measures.

In response, Moscow barred UK airways from touchdown at its airports or crossing its airspace, citing “unfriendly selections” by London.

Russian airline S7 introduced Friday it was suspending all of its flights to Europe, citing sanctions imposed on Moscow over the Kremlin’s invasion of Ukraine.

“Because of the closure of airspace by European nations, S7 Airways has determined to cancel all flights to Europe from February 26 to March 13,” the corporate mentioned in an announcement carried by Russian information businesses.

Virgin Atlantic mentioned skirting Russia would add quarter-hour to an hour to its flights between UK and India and Pakistan.

American Airways Group Inc mentioned it had re-routed its Delhi-New York flight. Rival United Airways, nevertheless, was nonetheless utilizing Russia’s airspace for Delhi-Chicago and Delhi-Newark flights, in response to Flightradar24.

Gulf service Emirates mentioned it had made minor routing modifications, resulting in barely longer flight occasions. United Parcel Service Inc mentioned it was implementing contingency plans.

OPSGROUP, an aviation trade cooperative that shares info on flight dangers, mentioned any plane travelling by means of Russian airspace ought to have such contingency plans in place for closed airspace as a consequence of dangers, or sanctions.

Income from Russian overflights goes to state service Aeroflot.

“Russia are unlikely to provoke their very own sanctions and airspace bans as they’d not want to see Aeroflot obtain reciprocal bans,” OPSGROUP mentioned. “Nonetheless, they could react in response to sanctions from different states.”

Airways have been additionally reeling from an increase in oil costs to greater than $105 a barrel for the primary time since 2014.

That raises working prices at a time when journey demand stays low due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Score company Fitch mentioned airways’ income and money flows may endure if crude costs continued to rise or stayed excessive.

Jefferies analysts mentioned European airways have been more likely to take a longer-term hit in gentle of the battle.

A community of thousands and thousands of components has additionally been affected.

Washington introduced export controls on items together with plane components. European Fee President Ursula von der Leyen mentioned the EU additionally deliberate to cease exporting such components to Russia. The USA mentioned there could be steps to uphold security.

“(W)e consider that sanctions and export management actions mustn’t hinder the necessity to keep flight security of economic plane,” mentioned Eric Fanning, chief govt of the US-based Aerospace Industries Affiliation.

Russian airways have 980 jets in service, of which 777 are leased, in response to analytics agency Cirium. Of those, 515 with an estimated market worth of $10 billion are rented from overseas.

Heavy fighting in Kyiv outskirts as Russia, Ukraine signal possibility of talks


Smoke and flames rise over in the course of the shelling close to Kyiv, as Russia continues its invasion of Ukraine on Saturday. (Gleb Garanich, Reuters)

Estimated learn time: 5-6 minutes

KYIV, Ukraine — Russian and Ukrainian forces clashed on the outskirts of the Ukrainian capital on Saturday as authorities urged residents to assist defend the town from advancing Russian forces within the worst European safety disaster in a long time.

Heavy, frequent artillery fireplace and intense gunfire, apparently far from the town heart, may very well be heard in Kyiv within the early hours, a Reuters witness mentioned. The Ukrainian navy mentioned Russian troops attacked a military base on a primary Kyiv avenue however the assault was repelled.

However even because the preventing grew extra intense, the Russian and Ukrainian governments signaled an openness to negotiations, providing the primary glimmer of hope for diplomacy since Russian President Vladimir Putin launched the invasion on Thursday.

“The destiny of Ukraine is being determined proper now,” Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy mentioned on Friday in a video handle posted to his Telegram channel. “Tonight, they’ll launch an assault. All of us should perceive what awaits us. We should face up to this evening.”

The air power command reported heavy preventing close to the air base at Vasylkiv southwest of the capital, which it mentioned was below assault from Russian paratroopers.

It additionally mentioned considered one of its fighters had shot down a Russian transport aircraft. Reuters couldn’t independently confirm the claims.

Kyiv residents had been advised by the protection ministry to make petrol bombs to repel the invaders, as witnesses reported listening to artillery rounds and intense gunfire from the western a part of the town.


Tonight, they’ll launch an assault. … The destiny of Ukraine is being determined proper now.

–Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy


Some households cowered in shelters after Kyiv was pounded on Thursday evening by Russian missiles. Others tried desperately to get on packed trains headed west, among the lots of of hundreds who’ve left their houses to seek out security, in accordance with the United Nations’ support chief.

After weeks of warnings from Western leaders, Putin unleashed a three-pronged invasion of Ukraine from the north, east and south on Thursday, in an assault that threatened to upend Europe’s post-Chilly Warfare order.

“I as soon as once more enchantment to the navy personnel of the armed forces of Ukraine: don’t permit neo-Nazis and (Ukrainian radical nationalists) to make use of your youngsters, wives and elders as human shields,” Putin mentioned at a televised assembly with Russia’s Safety Council on Friday. “Take energy into your individual palms.”

Putin has cited the necessity to “denazify” Ukraine’s management as considered one of his primary causes for invasion, accusing it of genocide in opposition to Russian-speakers in japanese Ukraine. Kyiv and its Western allies dismiss the accusations as baseless propaganda.

‘Prepared to speak’

Western international locations have introduced a barrage of sanctions on Russia, together with blacklisting its banks and banning expertise exports. However they’ve to date stopped in need of forcing it out of the SWIFT system for worldwide financial institution funds.

The US imposed sanctions on Putin, International Minister Sergei Lavrov, Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu and Chief of Basic Employees Valery Gerasimov. The European Union and Britain earlier froze any belongings Putin and Lavrov held of their territory. Canada took comparable steps.

Nonetheless, the regular ramping-up of financial restrictions has not deterred Putin.

People gather in an air raid shelter in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Friday.
Folks collect in an air raid shelter in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Friday. (Photograph: Viacheslav Ratynskyi, Reuters)

Moscow mentioned on Friday it had captured the Hostomel airfield northwest of the capital — a possible staging submit for an assault on Kyiv that has been fought over since Russian paratroopers landed there within the first hours of the warfare.

This might not be confirmed and Ukrainian authorities reported heavy preventing there.

However amid the chaos of warfare got here a ray of hope.

A spokesman for Zelenskyy mentioned Ukraine and Russia would seek the advice of in coming hours on a time and place for talks.

The Kremlin mentioned earlier it supplied to fulfill within the Belarusian capital Minsk after Ukraine expressed a willingness to debate declaring itself a impartial nation whereas Ukraine had proposed Warsaw because the venue. That, in accordance with Russian spokesman Dmitry Peskov, resulted in a “pause” in contacts.

“Ukraine was and stays prepared to speak a couple of ceasefire and peace,” Zelenskyy’s spokesman, Sergii Nykyforov, mentioned in a submit on Fb. “We agreed to the proposal of the President of the Russian Federation.”

However U.S. State Division spokesman Ned Value mentioned Russia’s supply was an try and conduct diplomacy “on the barrel of a gun” and that Putin’s navy should cease bombing Ukraine if it was critical about negotiations.

Isolation

On the U.N., Russia vetoed a draft Safety Council decision that might have deplored its invasion, whereas China abstained, a transfer Western international locations considered as proof of Russia’s isolation. The United Arab Emirates and India additionally abstained whereas the remaining 11 members voted in favor.

An image of what was occurring on the bottom throughout Ukraine — the most important nation in Europe after Russia — was sluggish to emerge.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy speaks alongside other Ukrainian officials in the governmental district of Kyiv, confirming that he is still in the capital, in Kyiv, Ukraine on Friday in this screengrab obtained from a handout video.
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy speaks alongside different Ukrainian officers within the governmental district of Kyiv, confirming that he’s nonetheless within the capital, in Kyiv, Ukraine on Friday on this screengrab obtained from a handout video. (Photograph: Ukrainian Presidential Press Service through Reuters)

Zelenskyy wrote on Twitter that there had been heavy preventing with deaths on the entrance to the japanese cities of Chernihiv and Melitopol, in addition to at Hostomel.

Witnesses mentioned they’d heard explosions and gunfire close to the airport in Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second metropolis, near Russia’s border. Ukraine’s navy mentioned Russian troops had been stopped with heavy losses close to the northeastern metropolis of Konotop.

There have been even have studies of preventing close to an air base some 20 miles southwest of Kyiv.

Britain’s protection ministry mentioned Russian armored forces had opened a brand new route of advance in the direction of the capital after failing to take Chernihiv.

Ukraine mentioned greater than 1,000 Russian troopers had been killed. Russia didn’t launch casualty figures. Zelenskyy mentioned late on Thursday that 137 troopers and civilians been killed within the preventing, with lots of wounded.

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken spoke to his Ukrainian counterpart and condemned reported civilian deaths, together with these of Ukrainian youngsters, in assaults round Kyiv, the State Division mentioned.

The White Home requested Congress for $6.4 billion in safety and humanitarian support for the disaster, officers mentioned.

Air raid sirens wailed over Kyiv for a second day on Friday as residents sheltered in underground metro stations.

Home windows had been blasted out of a 10-story condominium block close to the primary airport.

“How can we be dwelling by way of this in our time? Putin ought to burn in hell alongside along with his complete household,” mentioned Oxana Gulenko, sweeping damaged glass from her room.

Contributing: Aleksandar Vasovi, Alan Charlish, Fedja Grulovic, Natalia Zinets

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