Russian police jail kids who took flowers and ‘No to War’ signs to Ukraine’s embassy : NPR



They carried flowers, and handmade indicators studying “нет войне” — No to Struggle. They tried to put their message exterior Ukraine’s embassy in Moscow — and for that, they have been arrested.

That is the story rising in Russia about 5 youngsters, ages 7 to 11, who went with their moms to go to the embassy on Tuesday. Their tour might have served as a reminder of shared humanity, even throughout a battle. However police in Moscow did not see it that method. They detained the youngsters and fogeys, placing them in a holding cell.

The law enforcement officials shouted on the dad and mom, threatening that the “courageous mothers” would possibly lose their parental rights, based on Alexandra Arkhipova, who posted photographs and a video of the ordeal on her Fb web page.

The Moscow youngsters’s indicators embody photos of what, for now at the least, looks like an inconceivable equation: a Russian flag adopted by a plus signal and a Ukrainian flag, equaling a coronary heart.

The case obtained the eye of Ukrainian Overseas Minister Dmytro Kuleba, who shared images of the children and mentioned it was one other signal of the toll Russian President Vladimir Putin’s battle towards Ukraine is taking over youngsters.

Referring to Putin as he mentioned the youngsters being detained in Moscow, Kuleba mentioned, “That is how scared the person is.”

A video posted to Fb and different social media websites by Alexandra Arkhipova reveals a younger lady weeping as she is held in a cell. The lady, her mom and different youngsters have been arrested as they tried to convey flowers to the Ukrainian embassy in Moscow, Arkhipova mentioned.

Alexandra Arkhipova/Screenshot by NPR


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Alexandra Arkhipova/Screenshot by NPR


A video posted to Fb and different social media websites by Alexandra Arkhipova reveals a younger lady weeping as she is held in a cell. The lady, her mom and different youngsters have been arrested as they tried to convey flowers to the Ukrainian embassy in Moscow, Arkhipova mentioned.

Alexandra Arkhipova/Screenshot by NPR

Arkhipova mentioned that she relayed particulars concerning the arrests to the web site OVD-info, which screens potential police abuses in Russia. The location posted a video of what it mentioned was the second of the arrest. Within the footage, a baby’s cries may be heard echoing down the road the place a number of police autos have been massed.

Arkhipova, who’s an anthropology professional and researcher at RANEPA college, says the 2 moms are Ekaterina Zavizion and Olga Alter. She says they have been arrested together with their children, Liza Gladkova, 11, Gosha Petrov, 11, Matvey Petrov, 9, David Petrov, 7, and Sofya Gladkova, 7.

“A video attachment confirmed one of many ladies explaining to a crying lady from inside a cell that ‘the duty is for fewer individuals to collect and say they’re towards the battle,’ ” The Moscow Instances experiences.

After they have been arrested, the group was initially advised they may should spend the night time in a cell. However, Arkhipova mentioned in an replace, they have been launched and at the moment are going through potential court docket dates and fines.

“Proper now, we want the assistance of the neighborhood, assist of journalists and human rights activists,” she mentioned, as she shared the story on Fb, Telegram and different platforms.

As of Monday, Russian authorities had detained roughly 6,400 anti-war demonstrators for the reason that begin of the invasion final week, based on the workplace of the U.N. Excessive Commissioner for Human Rights.



New study: COVID-19 vaccines quickly lose effectiveness in kids 5-11


Registered nurse Clarece Glanville provides Robert Dennis-Garcia, 8, his first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine on the Legacy Occasions Middle in Farmington on Jan. 24. Utah mother and father are being suggested to not overreact to a brand new examine from New York displaying that it took simply over a month for the COVID-19 vaccine to supply kids 5-11 years outdated nearly no safety from getting the virus whereas changing into lower than 50% efficient at maintaining them out of the hospital. (Mengshin Lin, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah mother and father are being suggested to not overreact to a brand new examine from New York displaying that it took simply over a month for the COVID-19 vaccine to supply kids 5-11 years outdated nearly no safety from getting the virus whereas changing into lower than 50% efficient at maintaining them out of the hospital.

“That is one examine. Science may be very a lot one thing the place it is vital to have a look at many items of data earlier than we draw conclusions that straight affect what we’ll do,” state epidemiologist Dr. Leisha Nolen stated Tuesday, including she desires to see what’s occurring in different places earlier than accepting the outcomes.

“Do not take this as absolute truth,” she stated. “Take this nearly as good data that we actually must look into additional.”

Nolen stated the Utah Division of Well being continues to advocate mother and father get their kids vaccinated towards COVID-19, even because the state strikes towards treating the virus extra just like the flu or different endemic illness that continues to be lethal however shouldn’t be as widespread.

“It is all the time good to be ready,” she stated, for an additional wave of COVID-19 that is “fairly sure” to hit in some unspecified time in the future.

And even when the information from New York suggests the vaccines might not cease younger kids from getting the virus, Nolen stated “fortunately, they nonetheless have an inexpensive safety towards hospitalization. We all know that is what we’re actually aiming for, proper? We need to hold children out of the hospital.”

The examine, posted Monday by docs and researchers on the New York State Division of Well being and the College at Albany College of Public Well being in New York, discovered that in absolutely vaccinated kids ages 5-11, the vaccine’s safety towards COVID-19 infections fell from 68% in mid-December to simply 12% by the top of January.


Do not take this as absolute truth. Take this nearly as good data that we actually must look into additional.

–Dr. Leisha Nolen, state epidemiologist


When it got here to stopping hospitalization through the surge of the extremely transmissible omicron variant of the virus over the identical time interval, the 2 decreased doses of the Pfizer vaccine permitted for that age group dropped in effectiveness from 100% to 48%.

For absolutely vaccinated adolescents and youths ages 12-17, the examine discovered the declines in vaccine effectiveness throughout these weeks weren’t as steep, with safety towards an infection dropping from 66% to 51% and safety towards extreme sickness falling from 85% to 73%.

A giant distinction within the vaccine’s effectiveness towards an infection between ages 11 and 12 — the examine discovered within the week ending Jan. 30 that it was right down to 11% for 11-year-olds versus 67% for 12-year-olds — counsel the dimensions of the dose could also be an issue. Kids 5-11 obtain 1/3 the dose given these 12 and older.

The brand new knowledge follows disappointing outcomes from scientific trials of a fair smaller dose of the Pfizer vaccine in kids underneath 5 years outdated. Final month, the Meals and Drug Administration postponed a choice on whether or not to approve the pictures for kids as younger as 6 months outdated till a examine on the necessity for a 3rd dose is accomplished.

Nolen stated it is all the time a problem to find out the correct dosage for kids, and each the brand new examine and the scientific trials help whether or not the quantity of vaccine must be adjusted for youthful kids and booster pictures provided. Presently, booster pictures can be found solely to these 12 and older.

Her points with the New York examine embody what she stated is a better chance that kids who’re vaccinated towards the virus can be examined in the event that they present signs, presumably skewing the outcomes, in addition to the outcomes of house testing not being included since they don’t seem to be reported to the federal government.

COVID-19 vaccinations have slowed in Utah because the peak of the omicron surge right here, when circumstances rose about 13,000 a day and testing websites had been so overwhelmed that Gov. Spencer Cox urged most Utahns with signs to skip the swab and easily keep house till they felt higher.

Presently, 61% of all Utahns are absolutely vaccinated, which means it has been two weeks or extra since their preliminary sequence of pictures — two doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or a single dose of Johnson & Johnson. However solely 27% of Utah kids aged 5-11 have gotten each doses of Pfizer, the one selection in the US for these underneath 17.

Nolen stated there’s all the time a priority that questions raised concerning the effectiveness of vaccines in kids may hold mother and father from scheduling their pictures.

“We do need to be certain folks see there’s nonetheless a profit,” she stated, describing the most recent examine for instance of being clear about vaccines. “We’re not hiding knowledge. We’re not making an attempt to bias folks’s understanding. It is on the market.”

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Pfizer vaccine is less effective against infection for kids 5-11, study says : NPR


A medical employees member prepares a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a pop-up web site for school-aged individuals in New York Metropolis final October.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Pictures


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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Pictures


A medical employees member prepares a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a pop-up web site for school-aged individuals in New York Metropolis final October.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Pictures

The low-dose model of the Pfizer-BioNtech seems to be a lot much less efficient at defending younger kids in opposition to an infection than the higher-dose model of the vaccine given to older kids and adults, a brand new research exhibits.

In all circumstances, the vaccine proved to offer sturdy safety in opposition to getting severely ailing. The preprint research checked out knowledge collected from greater than 1.2 million totally vaccinated kids and adolescents between the ages of 5 and 17 from Dec. 13 to Jan. 30.

Researchers from the New York State Division of Well being discovered the flexibility of the vaccine to guard kids from catching the virus who received the bottom dose – youngsters ages 5 to 11 – dropped probably the most, falling from 68% to only 12%. These kids acquired and injection containing simply 10 mg, one-third of the dose given to older kids and adolescents and adults.

In the meantime, the effectiveness in kids ages 12 to 17, who received the identical 30 mg dose as adults, confirmed a smaller decline, dropping from 66% to 51%.

“These outcomes spotlight the potential want to check different vaccine dosing for youngsters and the continued significance layered protections, together with masks carrying, to forestall an infection and transmission,” the research acknowledged.

The outcomes of the research come simply days after the CDC eased masking tips in lots of components of the nation, and the identical day a number of faculty districts, together with New York Metropolis – the biggest within the nation – introduced scholar masks mandates would quickly be lifted.

It additionally follows an surprising delay within the approval course of for an emergency use authorization for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in kids 6 months via 4 years of age. The corporate stated new knowledge emerged, and the Meals and Drug Administration stated it wanted extra time to guage it.

Will lawmakers expand full-day kindergarten options for kids across the state?


Kindergartner Kira Bubeeva raises her hand throughout class at Woodrow Wilson Elementary College in Salt Lake Metropolis on Friday. Legislators are debating the newest model of HB193, which seeks to offer extra state funding to extend the variety of Utah public faculties that provide full-day kindergarten. (Laura Seitz, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah public faculties present simply 30% of their college students entry to full-day kindergarten in comparison with the remainder of the nation, the place 80% of scholars have entry to full-day applications.

“That is one thing that we shouldn’t be happy with,” State Superintendent of Public Instruction Sydnee Dickson instructed members of the Utah Legislature’s Senate Training Committee on Friday.

Dickson’s feedback got here throughout debate on the newest model of HB193, sponsored by Rep. Steve Waldrip, R-Eden, which seeks to offer extra state funding to extend the variety of Utah public faculties that provide full-day kindergarten.

Friday night, the legislature’s Government Appropriations Committee voted to acceptable $12.2 million in ongoing funding for the initiative, which is able to preserve this system shifting ahead however falls wanting increasing the initiative statewide.

The proposal has been broadly supported by the Utah State Board of Training, the associations that symbolize faculty boards and superintendents, and youngster advocacy organizations for almost a decade and incremental steps have been made, resembling a state grant program that helps help optionally available prolonged kindergarten applications in some faculty districts.

Kindergartners line up for lunch at Woodrow Wilson
Elementary School in Salt Lake City on Friday, Feb. 25, 2022.
Legislators are debating the latest version of HB193, which seeks
to provide more state funding to increase the number of Utah public
schools that offer full-day kindergarten.
Kindergartners line up for lunch at Woodrow Wilson
Elementary College in Salt Lake Metropolis on Friday, Feb. 25, 2022.
Legislators are debating the newest model of HB193, which seeks
to offer extra state funding to extend the variety of Utah public
faculties that provide full-day kindergarten. (Photograph: Deseret Information)

Different districts have funded full-day applications utilizing native funds and federal funding however need state help to make sure the hassle is sustainable and may develop.

Earlier on Friday, Cade Douglas, superintendent of the Sevier County College District, instructed members of the Senate Training Committee that college districts throughout the state are keen to supply full-day kindergarten applications to households however they want extra state assist to make that occur. He described it as “a very powerful funding we might make for kids and oldsters.”

Douglas mentioned he is been looking for expanded funding for this system from state lawmakers for greater than a decade.

“Each time I come and current in any schooling committee, I all the time finish by saying ‘Let’s fund optionally available all-day kindergarten,'” he mentioned.

HB193 hit a tough patch Friday when the newest model of the laws mentioned state funding for the initiative wouldn’t supplant funding that faculties presently providing extended-day kindergarten have devoted to this system.

Washington County College District Superintendent Larry Bergeson mentioned his faculty district has been a pioneer in providing extended-day kindergarten alternatives which have produced the info that helps additional enlargement of this system throughout the state.

“It is a concern that right here we’re as a district that is been proactive and pioneering this effort, which has taken a substantial quantity of effort and time and now … any district, not simply ourselves, will likely be penalized if we’re not permitted to obtain the funding that goes with this invoice,” he mentioned.

Senate Majority Whip Ann Millner, R-Ogden, acknowledged the stakeholders’ considerations with modifications to the invoice, noting that the Legislature’s appropriations course of was nearing its finish and language was amended to replicate these realities.

Kindergartner Gucci Carter eats lunch with his
classmates at Woodrow Wilson Elementary School in Salt Lake City on
Friday, Feb. 25, 2022. Legislators are debating the latest version
of SB193, which seeks to provide more state funding to increase the
number of Utah public schools that offer full-day
kindergarten.
Kindergartner Gucci Carter eats lunch along with his
classmates at Woodrow Wilson Elementary College in Salt Lake Metropolis on
Friday, Feb. 25, 2022. Legislators are debating the newest model
of SB193, which seeks to offer extra state funding to extend the
variety of Utah public faculties that provide full-day
kindergarten. (Photograph: Deseret Information)

She provided an modification establishing that the initiative wouldn’t supplant ongoing federal funding, a change Millner mentioned she hoped would “type of convey the temperature down a little bit bit.” She provided her assurances to proceed to work with Waldrip on different considerations however her remarks foreshadowed that full funding of the initiative possible would not occur.

“If we preserve this because it’s written, we will not fund it. It is like a doubling, $46 million within the final two or three days earlier than the finances is out. That simply cannot occur. So this was attempting to say, ‘Let’s discover a technique to preserve it shifting, continue to grow it,’ after which work out tips on how to discover a answer to this,” Millner mentioned.

With the modification and the sponsors’ assurances, the Senate Training Committee voted unanimously to ship HB193 to the Senate with a positive advice.

Full-day kindergarten was a funding precedence for Utah State Board of Training, which seeks to offer Utah households entry to equitable, optionally available full-day kindergarten. The board’s request envisioned phasing within the initiative over three years to present faculties time to recruit and rent academics, discover area of their buildings to accommodate full-day kindergarten courses and enhance the standard of academics’ instruction.

Entry to full-day kindergarten helps enhance college students’ literacy and numeracy and enhances pupil achievement long run.

Though full-day kindergarten applications will likely be considerably expanded, Utah regulation doesn’t require Utah kids to attend kindergarten. Mother and father preferring that their kids attend a half-day program will proceed to have that choice, too.

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Honesty, reassurance: How to talk to kids about Ukraine


A girl holds a toddler’s hand after crossing the border from Ukraine on the Romanian-Ukrainian border, in Siret, Romania, Friday. Hundreds of Ukrainians are fleeing from warfare by crossing their borders to the west in the hunt for security. (Andreea Alexandru, Related Press)

Estimated learn time: 5-6 minutes

NEW YORK — The pandemic, mass shootings, pure disasters, terror assaults. There’s been loads of tragedy and anxiousness for folks to type by way of with their children. Add Russia’s escalating invasion of Ukraine to the listing.

With occasions quickly unfolding on TV and throughout social media, youngster growth consultants urge dad and mom to test in with youngsters of all ages however to not fear if these conversations are temporary.

“For kids beneath the age of seven, it’d simply be acknowledging that one thing is occurring between Ukraine and Russia and ask, ‘Have you ever heard something?’ Take the kid’s lead,” mentioned Janine Domingues, a scientific psychologist on the nonprofit Baby Thoughts Institute in New York.

For all ages, honesty is paramount, she and others mentioned.

“Total, simply present reassurance, that that is what we all know proper now. Allow them to know you do not know all of the solutions however listed below are some locations we are able to go,” Domingues mentioned.

Across the globe, from the U.S. to Western Europe, Japan to South Korea and Australia, nations instantly denounced the Kremlin as Thursday’s preventing raised concern, sending shares tumbling and oil costs surging. President Joe Biden slapped Russia with a number of the broadest and hardest monetary penalties the world’s largest economic system can muster.

Karina Serio, 16, in Cecil County, Maryland, hopes to main in Russian and European research when she goes to school. For now, as a highschool sophomore, she helps Ukrainian children with their English by way of a web based volunteer group and moderates a bunch chat of as much as 600 Ukrainian youth at a time on the Telegram app.

“I feel it is scary,” she mentioned. “You understand, proper now I am sitting right here in my good home and there is folks my age sitting of their flats listening to sirens go off. They cannot sleep. They do not know what to do. And I really feel unhealthy, like, what can I do?”

Janice Torres in Brooklyn is amongst dad and mom already fielding questions from their children.

Svyatoslav, 6, plays with his tablet in a public basement used as a bomb shelter in Kyiv, Ukraine, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. Russia has launched a full-scale invasion of Ukraine, unleashing airstrikes on cities and military bases and sending troops and tanks from multiple directions in a move that could rewrite the world's geopolitical landscape.
Svyatoslav, 6, performs together with his pill in a public basement used as a bomb shelter in Kyiv, Ukraine, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022. Russia has launched a full-scale invasion of Ukraine, unleashing airstrikes on cities and navy bases and sending troops and tanks from a number of instructions in a transfer that might rewrite the world’s geopolitical panorama. (Picture: Emilio Morenatti, Related Press)

“She requested why they’re having a warfare? And if the children are in class,” Torres mentioned of her 8-year-old daughter. “She noticed me crying as I watched a video of a dad letting his child go on a bus. She instructed me that she’s glad America is just not at warfare. She would not need to go on a bus with out us.”

Dr. Gene Beresin, govt director of the free on-line useful resource hub the Clay Middle for Younger Wholesome Minds at Massachusetts Common Hospital in Boston, mentioned younger youngsters, tweens and even older teenagers have some fundamental questions in widespread in relation to warfare, whether or not they verbalize them or not: Am I secure? Are you, the folks caring for me, secure? How will this have an effect on my day-to-day life?

Although the invasion, for U.S. children, is taking part in out a number of thousand miles from residence, social media and tv protection could make it appear simply subsequent door.

“Many, many, many youngsters who witnessed 9/11 on TV, who witnessed the Oklahoma bombing on TV, who witnessed the Challenger catastrophe on TV, bought post-traumatic stress dysfunction. The media is large,” Beresin mentioned.

That is why some consultants warn towards leaving TV protection on consistently because the invasion performs out. For very younger youngsters, unplugging from screens altogether for some time might assist. Preschool children may have extra TLC time with a mum or dad or caregiver whereas they work by way of their feelings, Beresin mentioned.

“They know issues are troubled. They know issues are problematic. They might ask you in case you’re apprehensive. Youngsters of all ages might ask in case you’re apprehensive. And admittedly, you bought to be sincere. You’ll be able to say, ‘Sure, I’m, however we are able to handle this. We will get by way of this.’ I’d indulge them just a little bit,” he mentioned.


We have heard from an amazing variety of dad and mom already who’ve thanked us for protecting the story so forthrightly, and they’re telling us that they admire our calm and factual method as a result of their youngsters are frightened they usually weren’t positive what to say.

–Andrea Barbalich, Editor in Chief of The Week Junior


Andrea Barbalich is editor-in-chief of the Week Junior, a weekly newsmagazine for teenagers ages 8-14 with 100,000 subscribers in all 50 states. She and her workers have been protecting Ukraine.

“We’re very calm in our tone and we’re selective within the information that we current,” she mentioned. “We keep away from very scary and upsetting data and concentrate on the helpers wherever we are able to. Proper now, for instance, there are literally thousands of folks all over the world and plenty of governments working collectively to cease the battle and finish the preventing. There are folks on the bottom who’re serving to people who find themselves injured. There will likely be humanitarian assist for individuals who want it.”

The difficulty she shipped Tuesday, earlier than the newest outbreak of preventing, centered on troops amassing on the borders, outlined the shared historical past between Russia and Ukraine and defined the place of the U.S. Subsequent week’s concern will tackle the invasion.

“We have heard from an amazing variety of dad and mom already who’ve thanked us for protecting the story so forthrightly, and they’re telling us that they admire our calm and factual method as a result of their youngsters are frightened they usually weren’t positive what to say,” Barbalich mentioned.

For teenagers, mentioned Dr. Nick Hatzis of the outpatient psychological well being care facility Compass Well being Middle in Chicago, a very powerful step for folks is to “create an area that permits for listening.” Dialog on Ukraine could also be precisely what some children need and precisely what others may not, he mentioned.

“There’s going to be quite a lot of forwards and backwards,” mentioned Hatzis, medical director for youngster and adolescent applications. “We need to be sure that we’re actively selling our routines, our schedules, taking part within the significant actions in our lives and in our youngsters’ lives.”

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“Don’t Say Gaetz” Law Protects Florida’s Kids from Matt Gaetz


TALLAHASSEE (The Borowitz Report)—A proposed legislation that may ban any constructive dialogue of Consultant Matt Gaetz in Florida’s lecture rooms is being debated within the Florida Home.

The invoice, which has been dubbed “Don’t Say Gaetz,” has been written to guard Florida’s youngsters, its advocates mentioned.

“Our high-school children are uncovered to many risks every day,” mentioned Carol Foyler, a Florida mom who helps the invoice. “Clearly, although, no hazard is bigger than Matt Gaetz.”

Underneath the provisions of the invoice, Florida high-school college students could be required to take a semester-long course “in regards to the warning indicators that they’re in proximity to Matt Gaetz, and easy methods to forestall that from ever occurring,” Foyler mentioned.

“The answer to this drawback is training,” she mentioned. “You may’t simply pray the Gaetz away.”